A Good Example Shows the Way

A Good Example Shows the Way

Mati Kirschenbaum

In the opening words of this week’s Torah portion Yitro we find out that the news of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt and their victory over Amalek has reached Yitro, Moses’ father-in-law. Upon hearing such good tidings Yitro decides that his daughter Tzipora, Moses’ wife, and her two sons will no longer face any danger if they join the Israelites who are being led by their father and husband. Thus Yitro sets out on a journey to Mount Sinai, at the foot of which Moses has set camp. Seeing his family after a long separation brings Moses great joy. However, he doesn’t have much time to enjoy their company – he is able to spend only one evening with his close ones. The next day he has to go back to work. Here is how our Parashat describes his work:

Next day, Moses sat as magistrate among the people, while the people stood about Moses from morning until evening. (Exodus 18:13.)

Yitro, who has many years of experience in leading the Midianites, does not like the style of leadership exercised by Moses. Therefore he gives his son-in-law the following advice:

The thing you are doing is not right; you will surely wear yourself out, and these people as well. For the task is too heavy for you; you cannot do it alone. Now listen to me. I will give you counsel, and God be with you! You represent the people before God: you bring the disputes before God, and enjoin upon them the laws and the teachings, and make known to them the way they are to go and the practices they are to follow. You shall also seek out from among all the people capable men who fear God, trustworthy men who spurn ill-gotten gain. Set these over them as chiefs of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, and let them judge the people at all times. Have them bring every major dispute to you, but let them decide every minor dispute themselves. Make it easier for yourself by letting them share the burden with you. (Exodus 18:17-22.)

Following Yitro’s advice, Moses appoints some of the Israelites as chiefs responsible for judging issues of smaller importance, whereas from now on he will be responsible for communicating with the Eternal and with Israel’s elders. Freed from the burden of dealing with the smallest of the Israelites’ problems, Moses can now climb up Mount Sinai, where, during his meeting with God, he will receive the Torah. We could say that Yitro’s advice acts as a foundation without which Moses would not be able to build a social system which embodies the values that were revealed to him on Mount Sinai. Could you imagine a society in which one person is responsible both for teaching the members of the society how they should behave as well as for making sure that they abide by the law? I don’t think such a society would be able to function smoothly. Parashat Yitro teaches us that charismatic leaders are not able to shoulder the burden of managing great social projects without the organizational structures which make it possible for them to carry out complicated tasks. It is exactly owing to such structures that subsequent generations are able to act in agreement with the spirit of the values embraced by their predecessors.

I believe that many of us still cannot come to grips with the killing of Paweł Adamowicz, the mayor of Gdańsk. We wonder what actions we could undertake to make sure that his memory won’t be forgotten. We are afraid that his death is a sign that Poland has transformed into a country riddled with division and hatred, a country in which showing openness towards others might provoke hatred and violence.

Parashat Yitro teaches us that we can counteract such tendencies. We can carry on the heritage of Paweł Adamowicz by continuing his work, by taking part in actions which fulfill the ideals that he embraced. Just like he did, we can demand that our local governments introduce programs supporting the integration of immigrants. Just like Paweł Adamowicz we can support the rights of people from the LGBT community. Just like Paweł Adamowicz we can publicly declare that local patriotism and a sense of pride in being Europeans actually strengthen our attachment to Poland rather than weakening it. By acting this way we’ll be strengthening those structures in our society which promote the ideals that Paweł Adamowicz held very dear.

Yitro, Moses’ father-in-law, was not destined to participate in the offering of the Torah on Sinai. He goes back to his country before that event takes place. However, his service and assistance to the people of Israel will not be forgotten – the Parashat containing the description of how God and Israel entered into a covenant carries his name. Paweł Adamowicz did not live to see Poland fully implementing the ideals that he embraced. This Shabbat I encourage you to reflect on what kind of actions you could undertake to make sure that the vision of Poland which Paweł Adamowicz believed in can come true in honor of his memory. Zichrono livracha — may his memory be for a blessing.

Mati Kirschenbaum

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Parashat Vayera

Parashat Vayera

In this week’s Torah portion Vayera the Eternal commands Moses to inform the Israelites that their bondage is about to end. Moses is supposed to convey the following message to them:

I am the [Eternal]. I will free you from the labors of the Egyptians and deliver you from their bondage. I will redeem you with an outstretched arm and through extraordinary chastisements. And I will take you to be My people, and I will be your God. And you shall know that I, the [Eternal], am your God who freed you from the labors of the Egyptians. (Exodus 6:6-7.)

Shemot Rabbah, the collection of Midrashim containing explanations regarding the Book of Exodus, draws our attention to four verbs: free, deliver, redeem and “take you to be My people” – which are used in this passage to describe the liberation of the Israelites by the Eternal. According to the explanation presented in this collection of Midrashim, the four cups of vine which we drink during the Passover Seder are supposed to remind us of the promise regarding the four-stage liberation made to the Israelites by the Eternal. Every year, as we drink the four cups of wine, they remind us of the promise which was fulfilled by the Eternal.

In our Parashat the Israelites initially did not pay attention to the words of the Eternal:

But when Moses told this [the Eternal’s pledge] to the Israelites, they would not listen to Moses, their spirits crushed by cruel bondage.(Exodus 6:9.)

The Eternal, not discouraged by the Israelites’ lack of enthusiasm, commanded Moses to go to the Pharaoh and request that he frees his people. The Pharaoh was supposed to be convinced by the plagues inflicted upon Egypt. Midrash Tanchuma ascribed a different significance to the plagues: They were supposed to free the Israelites from the hard labor and the oppression inflicted on them by the Egyptians. The first plague, the transformation of the Nile’s waters into blood, was supposed to convince the Pharaoh to revoke his prohibition and allow Israelite women to use the mikveh. The second plague, the frogs, was supposed to force the Pharaoh to take back the order forcing the Israelites to bring crawling creatures to the Egyptians, since such creatures were an abomination to the Israelites. The third plague, lice, was supposed to convince the Pharaoh to revoke the order forcing the Israelites to clean the streets. The fourth plague, wild animals, was supposed to prompt the Pharaoh to prohibit forcing the Israelites to partake in hunting for wild animals. The fifth plague, boils, was supposed to convince the Pharaoh to stop forcing the Israelites to carry hot objects.

According to Midrash Tanchuma, the aim of all the other plagues was also to force the Pharaoh to revoke various decrees which were making the Israelites’ lives miserable. This Midrash seems to suggest that the Egyptian plagues were supposed to convince the Pharaoh to set the Israelites free, as well as to convince the Israelites to put trust in the Eternal’s promise. The Israelites were supposed to learn to trust the Eternal by noticing how the quality of their lives was gradually improving.

What can we learn from such an interpretation of the Egyptian plagues?
That sometimes, when we are overwhelmed by numerous everyday problems, we might overlook small changes foretelling that better times are coming. During this winter Shabbat I encourage you to take a look at the problems which have been at the center of your attention for a long time now. Who knows, perhaps it will turn out that the worst is already behind you?

Shabbat Shalom!

Mati Kirschenbaum

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Wajera

Wajera

Mati Kirschenbaum

W czytanej przez nas w tym tygodniu parszy Wajera Wiekuisty nakazuje Mojżeszowi poinformować Izraelitów, że ich niewola zbliża się ku końcowi. Mojżesz ma im przekazać następującą wiadomość:

Jam Wiekuisty. Wywiodę Was spod brzemienia Egiptu, uwolnię was od jarzma egipskiego i wybawię was z niewoli, i wyswobodzę was wyciągniętym ramieniem i przez surowe osądy. I wezmę sobie was za mój lud, i będę wam Bogiem, i przekonacie się, że Ja, Wiekuisty, Bóg wasz, uwolniłem was spod jarzma egipskiego. (Wyjścia 6,6-7)

Szmot Rabba, zbiór midraszy wyjaśniających Księgę Wyjścia, zwraca uwagę na cztery czasowniki – uwolnię, wybawię, wyswobodzę oraz wezmę za lud – użyte w tym fragmencie w celu opisania wyzwolenia Izraelitów przez Wiekuistego. Zgodnie z wyjaśnieniem zawartym w tej kolekcji midraszy, cztery kielichy wina wypijane przez nas w trakcie pesachowego sederu przypominają o obietnicy czteroetapowego wyzwolenia obiecanego Izraelitom przez  Wiekuistego. Wypijając co roku cztery kielichy wina, przypominamy sobie o dotrzymanej przez Wiekuistego obietnicy.

Izraelici w naszej parszy początkowo nie zwrócili uwagi na słowa Wiekuistego:

Mojżesz oznajmił te słowa (obietnicę Wiekuistego) Izraelitom, którzy nie chcieli ich słuchać z powodu udręki ducha i z powodu ciężkich robót.  (Wyjścia 6,9)

Niezrażony brakiem entuzjazmu Izraelitów Wiekuisty nakazał Mojżeszowi udać się do faraona z prośbą o wypuszczenie swojego ludu. Faraona przekonać miały zesłane na Egipt plagi. Midrasz Tanchuma przypisywał plagom inne znaczenie: miały one uwolnić Izraelitów od ciężkiej pracy i ucisku nałożonych na nich przez Egipcjan. Pierwsza plaga, zamiana wód Nilu w krew, miała przekonać faraona do odwołania zakazu korzystania Izraelitek z mykwy. Druga plaga, żaby, miała zmusić faraona do odwołania nakazu przynoszenia Egipcjanom pełzających stworzeń będących dla Izraelitów obrzydliwością. Trzecia plaga, wszy, miała zmusić faraona do odwołania nakazu pracy Izraelitów przy sprzątaniu ulic. Czwarta plaga, dzikie zwierzęta, miała zmotywować faraona do zakazu zmuszania Izraelitów do udziału w polowaniu na dzikie zwierzęta. Piąta plaga, wrzody, miała zmusić faraona do zaprzestania zmuszania Izraelitów do noszenia gorących obiektów.

Według midraszu Tanchuma także pozostałe plagi miały na celu odwołanie edyktów uprzykrzających Izraelitom życie. Midrasz ten zdaje się nam sugerować, że plagi egipskie miały przekonać faraona do wyzwolenia Izraelitów, a Izraelitów do ufania obietnicy Wiekuistego. Izraelici mieli nauczyć się ufać Wiekuistemu widząc, jak stopniowo poprawia się ich jakość życia.

Czego możemy się nauczyć, czytając taką interpretację plag egipskich?

Tego, że czasem, przytłoczeni licznymi problemami codzienności, możemy przeoczyć drobne zmiany zwiastujące nadejście lepszych czasów. W ten zimowy Szabat zachęcam Was do przyjrzenia się problemom, na których od dawno skupia się Wasza energia. Kto wie, może okaże się, że najgorsze macie już za sobą?

Szabat Szalom!

 

Mati Kirschenbaum

Enslaved in Parental Lack of Attention and Brotherly Jealousy

Enslaved in Parental Lack of Attention and Brotherly Jealousy

Mati Kirschenbaum,

When I was 13 or 14 years old, I really wanted to have a pair of Wrangler jeans. However, my parents thought they were relatively expensive, so they would buy me pairs of other, cheaper brands instead. Then they would spend the money thus saved to send me to an additional summer camp or to pay for my foreign language classes. Today I’m grateful that my education was a priority for them. However, as a teenager I saw it differently. I truly envied some of my classmates who owned such designer jeans. It seemed to me that they would respect me more if I also had such a pair of jeans. As time passed – and also due to the fact that I’ve had a chance to buy myself designer jeans (thanks to which I know that wearing them did not magically make my life better) I forgot about how jealous I was of my classmates who wore Wranglers. But I was reminded of this feeling as I was reading this week’s Torah portion Vayeshev, which tells the story of Jacob-Israel’s approach towards his twelve sons. It is described as follows:

Now Israel loved Joseph best of all his sons, for he was the child of his old age; and he had made him an ornamented tunic. And when his brothers saw that their father loved him more than any of his brothers, they hated him so that they could not speak a friendly word to him. (Genesis 37:3-4.)

Joseph, just like my classmates, wore clothes which served as a symbol of social status and which could turn into a coveted object, or even into an object of envy. The underlying source of these feelings was the need to feel accepted and recognized. As a teenager I personally wanted to be part of a “cool” group, and the pair of jeans was in fact only of secondary importance to me. And Joseph’s brothers were not actually jealous of his ornamented tunic, but of what that tunic symbolized – the recognition and love of Israel.

My need to find a group of school friends was fulfilled; with time I did find friends with whom I shared a hobby and who did not care about designer clothes. The need to feel accepted and to feel like you belong is much more difficult to fulfill when it is associated with long-lasting relationships, especially within one’s family. As parents bring up their children, it is extremely important that they adhere to rules of justice by showing all their children equal attention and warmth. Otherwise tensions arise between siblings, as they increasingly seek their parent’s attention, since they feel neglected and passed over. Such tensions can turn into an open conflict and hostility, which stem from an underlying sense of hurt which has been growing over the years. And that’s exactly what happens in the family of Israel – his sons are no longer able to stand Joseph’s arrogance, as he considers his status as their father’s favorite as something obvious. Finally, Joseph’s brother’s hatred bursts out and they relieve the tension present in their family by selling him into slavery. Such a way of “resolving” their family issues brings great suffering to their father, Israel.

Most of us would probably never even think of selling one of our family members into slavery, not even the most annoying ones. But this does not mean that there is no tension present in our families. On the contrary, in almost every family someone feels hurt because their parents showed or still show more attention to one of their siblings; or because their parents had no time or energy to take care of them when they were little, but they did have time to take care of their brother or sister; or because their parents portrayed their older sister as an unparalleled example of virtues.

Such a sense of hurt can reveal itself after many years and erupt with much more intensity. What can we do in order to avoid this? It depends on our role within the family. If we are the parents, we can try to show all our children, even the most rebellious teenagers, how much we care about them. If we have siblings, we can ask ourselves if we are not trying to attract our parent’s attention at the expense of our brothers and sisters. In addition, if we sense a tension in our relationship with our brother or sister, we can ask ourselves if it doesn’t stem from the feeling that one sibling was always the favorite. If that is the case, we must ask ourselves if we can improve our relationship by undertaking actions aiming to promote our family’s reconciliation. This is not easy, and such a process can often take even many years.

Selling Joseph into slavery, which was the culmination of the hatred growing within Israel’s family, proved to be beneficial for the Jewish nation, since it allowed the Israelites to find shelter in Egypt during the famine. However, this became possible only after a long time of separation and a painful reconciliation. By describing the eruption of hatred between the sons of Israel, which stemmed from the mistakes that he [Israel] made as a parent, Parashat Vayeshev warns us to avoid situations which could lead to the escalation of family conflicts. This Shabbat I encourage you to reflect on how you could alleviate conflicts and tensions within your family.

Shabbat Shalom!

Mati Kirschenbaum,

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

W niewoli rodzicielskiej nieuwagi i braterskiej zazdrości

W niewoli rodzicielskiej nieuwagi i braterskiej zazdrości

Mati Kirschenbaum,

Gdy miałem 13-14 lat, bardzo chciałem mieć dżinsy Wranglera. Moi rodzice uważali jednak, że są one relatywnie drogie i kupowali mi spodnie innych, tańszych marek. Zaoszczędzone w ten sposób pieniądze rodzice wydawali, wysyłając mnie na dodatkowy wakacyjny obóz albo na lekcje języków obcych. Dziś jestem im wdzięczny za uznawanie mojej edukacji za priorytet wśród ich wydatków. Jako nastolatek widziałem to jednak inaczej. Okropnie zazdrościłem niektórym moim kolegom z klasy ich markowych dżinsów. Wydawało mi się, że koledzy ci bardziej by mnie szanowali, gdybym takie nosił. Upływ czasu oraz fakt, że zdarzyło mi się kupić markowe dżinsy (dzięki czemu wiem, że ich noszenie nie zmieniło w magiczny sposób mojego życia na lepsze) pozwoliły mi zapomnieć o zazdrości, jaką czułem wobec moich noszących Wranglery kolegów. Przypomniałem sobie jednak o tym uczuciu, czytając przypadającą na ten tydzień parszę Wajeszew, opowiadającą historię stosunku Jakuba – Izraela do jego dwunastu synów. Odnajdujemy w niej następujące słowa:

 Izrael miłował Józefa najbardziej ze wszystkich swych synów, gdyż urodził mu się on w podeszłych jego latach. Sprawił mu też wzorzystą szatę. Bracia Józefa widząc, że ojciec kocha go bardziej niż wszystkich, tak go znienawidzili, że nie mogli zdobyć się na to, aby przyjaźnie z nim porozmawiać. (Rdz. 37, 3-4)

Józef, podobnie jak moi koledzy z klasy, nosił ubranie będące symbolem statusu społecznego, mogące stać się przedmiotem pożądania, a nawet zazdrości. Uczucia te miały swoje źródło w potrzebie akceptacji i uznania. Ja jako nastolatek chciałem być członkiem grupy, która była cool, dżinsy miały dla mnie tak naprawdę drugorzędne znaczenie. Z kolei bracia Józefa zazdrościli mu nie wzorzystej szaty, tylko tego, co ta szata symbolizuje – uznania i miłości Izraela.

Moja potrzeba znalezienia kręgu szkolnych znajomych została zaspokojona; z biegiem czasu znalazłem przyjaciół, z którymi dzieliłem hobby, dla których markowe ubrania nie były istotne. Potrzebę akceptacji i przynależności jest zaspokoić dużo trudniej, gdy dotyczy ona długotrwałych relacji, zwłaszcza w rodzinie. W procesie wychowania dzieci przez rodziców niezwykle istotna jest sprawiedliwość wyrażająca się przez okazywanie dzieciom jednakowej uwagi i ciepła. Jeśli tak się nie dzieje, w kontaktach między rodzeństwem pojawiają się napięcia wynikające ze wzmożonych starań o względy rodziców, podejmowanych przez braci i siostry, którzy czują się zaniedbywani i pominięci. Napięcia te mogą przerodzić się w otwarty konflikt i wrogość, wynikającą z rosnącego przez lata poczucia krzywdy. Tak właśnie dzieje się w rodzinie Izraela, którego synowie nie są w stanie dłużej tolerować arogancji Józefa, uważającego swój status ulubieńca ojca za coś oczywistego. Bracia Józefa w końcu wybuchają, rozładowują rodzinne napięcie poprzez sprzedanie go w niewolę. Takie „rozwiązanie” rodzinnego problemu przysparza ich ojcu, Izraelowi, wielkich cierpień.

Myślę, że większości z nas nigdy nie przyszłoby do głowy sprzedać członków rodziny, nawet tych najbardziej uprzykrzonych. Nie oznacza to jednak, że nasze rodziny pozbawione są napięć. Przeciwnie, w prawie każdej rodzinie ktoś czuje się poszkodowany, bo rodzice okazywali lub okazują więcej uwagi jego rodzeństwu; bo rodzice nie mieli czasu lub sił się nim zajmować, gdy był mały, a jego rodzeństwem tak; bo rodzice stawiali jej starszą siostrę za niedościgniony wzór.

Takie poczucie krzywdy może ujawnić się po latach, wybuchając ze zdwojoną siłą. Co możemy zrobić, żeby tego uniknąć? To zależy od naszej roli w rodzinie. Jeśli jesteśmy rodzicami, możemy starać się pokazać wszystkim naszym dzieciom, nawet najbardziej buntowniczym nastolatkom, jak bardzo nam na nich zależy. Jeśli mamy rodzeństwo, możemy się zastanowić, czy nie staramy się skupić uwagi rodziców na sobie kosztem naszych braci i sióstr. Co więcej, jeżeli wyczuwamy napięcie w naszych kontaktach z rodzeństwem, możemy spróbować zastanowić się, czy nie wynika ono z poczucia, że ktoś z rodzeństwa był faworyzowany. Jeżeli tak było, musimy się zastanowić, czy jesteśmy w stanie poprawić nasze relacje przez podejmowanie działań służących rodzinnemu pojednaniu. Nie jest to łatwe, niejednokrotnie taki proces potrafi trwać nawet wiele lat.

Sprzedanie Józefa w niewolę, stanowiące kulminację narastającej w rodzinie Izraela nienawiści, przysłużyło się narodowi żydowskiemu, gdyż pozwoliło Izraelitom znaleźć schronienie w Egipcie w czasie klęski głodu. Stało się to jednak dopiero możliwe po długim czasie rozłąki i bolesnym pojednaniu. Opisując wybuch nienawiści między synami Izraela, wynikający z jego błędów jako rodzica, parasza Wajeszew przestrzega nas przed doprowadzaniem rodzinnych konfliktów do eskalacji. W ten Szabat zachęcam Was do zastanowienia się, jak możecie załagodzić rodzinne konflikty i napięcia.

Szabat Szalom!

Mati Kirschenbaum

Wrestling in the night

Wrestling in the night

Mati Kirschenbaum

You’ve prepared your clothes for the next day. You brushed your teeth. You turned off the light. You’ve assumed your favorite sleeping position. But  somehow you cannot fall asleep. Does this sound familiar?

Many of us experience problems with falling asleep. We are bothered by thoughts for which we did not have time throughout the day, as we were busy crossing out subsequent positions from our long to-do lists. But under the cover of the night – the time which we have set aside for rest – our mind gives itself the right to take a look at matters which we have pushed aside for later, since dealing with them during the day could make it difficult for us to fulfill our responsibilities. These thoughts often reflect our worries – about work, about money, about health, our relationships or the future of our children. They make it hard for us to fall asleep, and we often wrestle with them for many hours. The next day we are sleep deprived, which makes it harder for us to fulfill our current responsibilities.

In this week’s Parashat Vayishlach Jacob faces a completely different challengbe – he is forced to fight with a mysterious being, whom many commentators describe as an angel. His wrestling is described as follows:

Jacob was left alone. And [someone] wrestled with him until the break of dawn. When he saw that he had not prevailed against him, he wrenched Jacob’s hip at its socket, so that the socket of his hip was strained as he wrestled with him. Then he said, “Let me go, for dawn is breaking.” But he answered, “I will not let you go, unless you bless me.”  Said the other, “What is your name?” He replied, “Jacob.”  Said he, “Your name shall no longer be Jacob, but Israel, for you have striven with beings divine and human, and have prevailed.”  Jacob asked, “Pray tell me your name.” But he said, “You must not ask my name!” And he took leave of him there (Genesis  32:25-30.)

Our sages were not sure how to interpret this wrestling. Pirkot DeRabbi Eliezer, a collection of medieval Midrashim, explains this wrestling with an angel as a kind of punishment imposed by the Eternal on Jacob for not keeping the promise which he made in Betel, where Jacob pledged that he would offer a tithe to the Eternal, which he did not do. Ramban, the Medieval Spanish scholar, viewed this struggle as a metaphor for the fate that would befall the people of Israel – the conflict with the Romans (who were perceived as the spiritual heir of Esau), in which the descendants of Jacob would prevail,  managing to preserve Jewish tradition in spite of persecutions. Radak, the Medieval French Torah commentator viewed the injuries suffered by Jacob as a harbinger of the misfortunes awaiting his daughter Dinah. In addition, Radak claimed that his wrestling with the angel was a kind of punishment for Jacob not trusting the Eternal – which manifested itself in the meticulous preparations for his meeting with Esau, which suggested that Jacob did not trust that the Eternal would be able to protect him from Esau’s wrath.

The above mentioned examples of various possible interpretations of Jacob’s wrestling with an angel serve as proof of the ambiguity of this story. In addition, they tell us what kinds of problems were associated with this struggle in the view of our sages. These were problems related to taxes (since a tithe is a kind of tax), health problems (problems with the hip socket), concern about the future of our children (the issue of Dinah’s future) and the fight for the right to remain yourself even in unfavorable conditions (the future conflict with Rome). It turns out that our sages viewed Jacob’s struggle with the angel as a metaphor for various problems which can give us sleepless nights in our own times as well. What’s important is that our Parashat teaches us that we can in fact overcome these problems. This belief is reflected in the use of the word “Israel” – this is the name that was given to Jacob after his struggle and it denotes someone who successfully wrestles with the world. I hope that you will think of Jacob-Israel’s victory whenever your problems start to bother you again in the midst of the night. Perhaps this will help you fall asleep faster that Jacob did, before the break of dawn.

Mati Kirschenbaum

Translation from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Infertility – A Shared Problem

Infertility – A Shared Problem  

 

Mati Kirschenbaum


Mi Dor va Dor — from generation to generation – these words have a special significance in our tradition. They symbolize the continuity of the chain of passing on Jewish tradition despite centuries of persecution, due to which throughout the first thousand years after the destruction of the Temple the number of Jews living across the world significantly decreased. In addition, they reflect the concerns of generations of Jews worried whether they will be able to produce offspring who would carry on the tradition of their parents and grandparents in difficult times.

Ele toldot Yitzhak ben Avraham — “This is the story [generations; offspring] of Isaac, son of Abraham.” (Genesis 25:19) – these are the opening words of our Parashat. We can only wonder whether the sages who established the Torah reading cycle chose these words for the beginning of our Parashat because they wanted to bring to our attention the suffering caused by infertility, which in their view made it impossible to fully enjoy family life.

This interpretation seems to be confirmed by the following verses of our Parashat, in which we read,

Isaac was forty years old when he took to wife Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel the Aramean of Paddan-aram, sister of Laban the Aramean. Isaac pleaded with the [Eternal] [facing] his wife, because she was barren; and the [Eternal] responded to his plea, and his wife Rebekah conceived. Isaac was sixty years old when they [Jacob and Esau] were born. (Genesis 25:20-21,26.)

Isaac and Rivka waited for their offspring for twenty years! What’s interesting is that if we translate the above quoted Hebrew text literally, it turns out that Isaac is not praying ON BEHALF of his wife, but facing his wife. Rashi interpreted this verse literally, claiming that Isaac and Rivka stood facing each other as they were pleading together, with their faces directed towards each other. This interpretation makes Rivka’s infertility not only a tragedy for the man who was worried that he wouldn’t be able to prolong his line, since it stresses that fertility problems pose a great psychological burden on both sexes. Sforno, the Italian Renaissance-era commentator, explained these words in a different way, noting that Isaac was aware of the promise assuring that Abraham’s family line would be made into a great nation and that he trusted that this promise would be fulfilled. Therefore he was pleading not so much for having any children (with any of his potentially many wives), but for having children specifically with Rivka. These interpretations can serve as a guideline for men supporting their female partners who are having trouble getting pregnant.

You could ask: And what about male infertility? Does our tradition, established in  patriarchic Biblical times, allow for the possibility that it could be in fact the man who is infertile?

In tractate Yevamot 64a of the Babylonian Talmud we find exactly such an interpretation! Rabbi Yitzhak (aptly named!) claims there that not only Rivka, but  Isaac as well was infertile, which explains why they were praying together. Such an explanation for why they were praying together helps us (and all the generations engaged in Talmudic studies) realize that women are not the only ones responsible for infertility problems.

In the passage from the beginning of our Parashat quoted above you can also see that the Eternal listens to Isaac’s prayer – Rivka is not being mentioned, even though she is the one who is believed to be infertile. Rabbinical tradition explains this by pointing to the family ties between Rivka and Laban, her brother, whose behavior caused much suffering to her son Jacob. This idea of collective responsibility can seem shocking to us, modern-day Jews. However, some solace can be derived from the fact that Rivka’s prayer was not rejected because of her gender.

Rabbinical interpretations of Isaac’s and Rivka’s troubles with conceiving show us that marital infertility is a very old problem. They seem to suggest that the involvement of both partners and their mutual support can help both of them get through the hard times as they try to conceive their much desired offspring. However, this is not easy, especially when their close ones show no sensitivity by asking questions such as: “So, when are you finally going to have a child?”. This Shabbat I encourage you to reflect on how you could support members of your family or your friends who are struggling – or might be struggling – with infertility. Shabbat Shalom!

Shabbat Shalom!

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Niepłodność — wspólny problem

Niepłodność — wspólny problem

Mati Kirschenbaum


Mi dor wa dor — z pokolenia na pokolenie — słowa te mają w naszej tradycji szczególne znaczenie. Symbolizują one ciągłość łańcucha przekazywania tradycji żydowskiej pomimo wieków prześladowań, które przez pierwsze tysiąc lat po zniszczeniu Świątyni znacząco zmniejszyły liczbę Żydów na świecie. Wiąże się z nimi także troska pokoleń Żydów o doczekanie się potomstwa, które będzie kontynuować tradycję swoich rodziców i dziadków w trudnych czasach.

Ele toldot Icchak ben Awraham — „oto pokolenia (potomstwo) Izaaka, syna Abrahama” (Rdz 25,19) – tak brzmią początkowe słowa naszej parszy. Możemy się tylko zastanawiać, czy mędrcy, którzy wyznaczyli cykl czytania Tory, wybrali te słowa jako początek naszej parszy, gdyż chcieli zwrócić naszą uwagę na cierpienia związane z niepłodnością, uniemożliwiającą w ich przekonaniu pełne cieszenie się życiem rodzinnym.

Wskazywałyby na to kolejne wersy naszej parszy, w których czytamy:

Izaak miał czterdzieści lat, gdy wziął sobie za żonę Rebekę, córkę Betuela, Aramejczyka z Paddan-Aram, siostrę Labana Aramejczyka. Izaak wznosił błagania do Wiekuistego naprzeciwko swojej żony, gdyż była ona niepłodna. Wiekuisty wysłuchał go i Rebeka, żona Izaaka, stała się brzemienna. Izaak miał lat sześćdziesiąt, gdy mu się oni (Jakub i Ezaw) urodzili. (Rdz 25, 20-21,26)

Izaak i Rywka czekali na potomstwo dwadzieścia lat! Co interesujące, jeśli wiernie przetłumaczymy powyższy tekst hebrajski, Izaak nie modli się ZA swoją żonę, ale naprzeciwko swojej żony. Raszi interpretował ten wers dosłownie, twierdząc, że Izaak i Rywka wspólnie wznosili błagania, stojąc naprzeciwko siebie ze skierowanymi ku sobie twarzami. Interpretacja ta czyni z niepłodności Rywki nie tylko tragedię mężczyzny obawiającego się, że nie przedłuży on swojego rodu, poprzez zauważenie, że problemy z płodnością są wielkim obciążeniem psychicznym dla obydwu płci. Sforno, włoski komentator epoki Renesansu, wyjaśnił te słowa inaczej, zauważając, że Izaak zdawał sobie sprawę z obietnicy uczynienia rodu Abrahama wielkim narodem i ufał jej. Modlił się zatem nie tyle o doczekanie się potomstwa (z jedną z potencjalnie wielu żon), ile o doczekanie się potomstwa z Rywką. Interpretacje te mogą być wzorem dla mężczyzn wspierających swoje partnerki zmagające się z problemami z zajściem w ciążę.

Możecie się zapytać: a co z męską niepłodnością? Czy nasza tradycja, powstała w patriarchalnych biblijnych czasach, dopuszcza możliwość, że to mężczyzna może być niepłodny?

W traktacie Jewamot 64a Talmudu Babilońskiego odnajdujemy taką interpretację! Rabin Izaak (nomen omen) stwierdza tam, że nie tylko Rywka, ale i Izaak byli niepłodni, co wyjaśnia, dlaczego modlili się wspólnie. Takie wyjaśnienie wspólnej modlitwy uświadamia nam (oraz pokoleniom studiujących Talmud), że nie tylko kobiety są odpowiedzialne za problemy z zajściem w ciążę.

W przytoczonym na początku fragmencie parszy mogliście także zauważyć, że Wiekuisty wysłuchuje modlitwy Izaaka, Rywka nie jest wymieniona, mimo że to jej przypisuje się niepłodność. Tradycja rabiniczna wyjaśnia to pokrewieństwem Rywki z Labanem, jej bratem, którego zachowanie przysporzyło cierpień jej synowi Jakubowi. Taka odpowiedzialność zbiorowa może nas, współczesnych Żydów, szokować. Pewną pociechą jest jednak fakt, że modlitwa Rywki nie zostaje odrzucona ze względu na jej płeć.

Rabiniczne interpretacje problemów Izaaka i Rywki z poczęciem pokazują nam, że niepłodność małżeńska jest bardzo starym problemem. Zdają się one sugerować, że zaangażowanie obojga partnerów i wzajemne wsparcie mogą pomóc partnerom przetrwać czas starania się o upragnione potomstwo. Nie jest to jednak łatwe, zwłaszcza gdy najbliższe otoczenie nie zachowuje się we wrażliwy sposób, np. pytając „To kiedy zdecydujecie się na dziecko?”. W ten Szabat zachęcam Was do zastanowienia się, jak możecie wspierać waszych członków rodziny lub przyjaciół, którzy zmagają się — lub mogą się zmagać — z problemem niepłodności.

Szabat Szalom!

 

Mati Kirschenbaum

Local Government vs Sodom

Local Government vs Sodom

Mati Kirschenbaum

For almost a week now the election posters that are still hanging in many places have been reminding us of the frenzy of the local government elections. Many of us are still celebrating the victory of the candidates we supported; some of us must come to terms with the defeat of our favorite candidates or wait for the second round of the electoral battle. In our community there are probably also those who did not cast their vote, since “they do not trust anyone”, “one is as bad as the other”, or since “my vote won’t change anything anyways”. The high rate of those who do not participate in elections is nothing unusual. In this year’s elections voter turnout exceeded 50 percent for the first time since 1989. This is probably due to the fact that the current elections reflect the deep polarization of Polish political life, which makes it seem difficult to find common ground for agreement at the local level. That is why many of us decided to support a given electoral committee because of the values represented by the national political party linked with it.  Some of us decided to support electoral committees unrelated to political parties, such as various urban movements, hoping that they will change our towns and villages into better places to live.

This week’s parashat Vayera describes the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah – two cities which most certainly were not a good place to live in for those who hold dear the idea of social justice. Here is how prophet Ezekiel describes their transgressions:


“Only this was the sin of your [Israel’s] sister Sodom: arrogance! She and her daughters had plenty of bread and untroubled tranquility; yet she did not support the poor and the needy. In their haughtiness, they committed abomination before Me; and so I removed them, as you saw.”
(Ezekiel 16:49-50.)

Interestingly, the main sin of Sodom in the view of prophet Ezekiel seems to be its indifference to the injustice suffered by the underprivileged. Many commentators emphasize the fact that the beginning of our Parashat seems to deliberately contrast Abraham and Sarah’s hospitality towards strangers with the amoral behavior of the residents of Sodom, who wanted to sexually abuse Lot’s guests. According to these commentators the main sin of the residents of Sodom and Gomorrah was the abuse of strangers and wanderers, of people who did not benefit from the protection enjoyed by the members of the local community.

Rabbinical tradition claims that contempt and abuse of the disadvantaged had become part of Sodom’s legal system. Among others Sodom’s law ordered those who had been wounded to pay their perpetrators for the wounds they had inflicted. Helping the weak and the poor was prohibited and harsh punishment awaited those who would not abide by this rule.

Thus Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed not because of occasional acts of violence towards the needy and the disadvantaged; their fate was sealed because of the laws passed by the local government.

Fortunately, modern-day local authorities do not have a mandate allowing them to punish the weak for their weaknesses. Nonetheless, they could still implement a policy de facto favoring certain social groups. For example, they could allow developers to carry out their building projects in urban green areas, they could cut the funds for Municipal Social Services Offices and for social housing as the first step of their “austerity measures”, they could design an explicitly car-friendly city  or close down Municipal Cultural Centers. None of these actions in and of itself makes a city uninhabitable. However, try to imagine a city in which access to green areas, culture, social services and public transport is provided only for the rich. Wouldn’t it resemble Sodom from the Book of Ezekiel and from Rabbinical literature? Wouldn’t it be a terrible place to live in?

Contrary to Lot, who had no influence over the norms of conduct adopted in Sodom, we – modern-day voters – do have a say when it comes to urban policy. It is up to us whether we monitor and react to those decisions of our city or district councils which directly impact our lives. This is undoubtedly more demanding than simply putting a cross next to a name on the ballot. But in the long run our active interest in the actions of our local government can make our towns and villages better places to live. May it be so – Ken Jehi Racon! And Shabbat Shalom.

Mati Kirschenbaum

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Samorząd a Sodoma – parasza Wajera

Samorząd a Sodoma

Mati Kirschenbaum

Od niemal tygodnia wiszące wciąż w wielu miejscach plakaty przypominają nam o gorączce wyborów samorządowych. Wielu z nas wciąż cieszy się ze zwycięstwa popieranych przez nas kandydatów; inni muszą pogodzić się z porażką naszych faworytów lub czekać na drugą turę wyborczych zmagań. W naszej społeczności znajdziemy też pewnie osoby, które nie oddały głosu, bo „nikomu nie ufają”, „oni wszyscy są siebie warci”, bo „mój głos nic nie zmieni”. Wysoki odsetek niegłosujących nie jest niczym wyjątkowym. W tegorocznym głosowaniu po raz pierwszy od 1989 roku frekwencja wyborcza przekroczyła 50 procent. Wynika to zapewne z faktu, że obecne wybory odzwierciedlają głęboką polaryzację polskiego życia politycznego, która utrudnia zauważenie płaszczyzny porozumienia na szczeblu lokalnym. Dlatego wielu z nas zdecydowało się poprzeć określony komitet wyborczy ze względu na wartości reprezentowane przez powiązaną z nim partię ogólnokrajową. Część z nas postanowiła poprzeć komitety niezwiązane z partiami politycznymi, np. ruchy miejskie, w nadziei, że uczynią oni nasze miasta i wsie lepszymi miejscami do życia.

Czytana przez nas w tym tygodniu parasza Wajera opisuje zniszczenie Sodomy i Gomory, dwóch miast, które z całą pewnością nie były dobrym miejscem do życia dla osób przywiązanych do idei sprawiedliwości społecznej. Prorok Ezekiel opisuje ich przewiny w następujący sposób:

„Oto taka była wina siostry twojej (Izraela), Sodomy: odznaczała się ona i jej córki wyniosłością, obfitością dóbr i spokojną pomyślnością, ale nie wspierały biednego i potrzebującego. Co więcej, uniosły się pychą i dopuszczały się tego, co wobec Mnie jest obrzydliwością. Dlatego je odrzuciłem, jak to widziałaś” (Ezekiel 16, 49-50).

Co interesujące, głównym grzechem Sodomy w rozumieniu proroka Ezekiela wydaje się nieczułość na krzywdę osób nieuprzywilejowanych. Wielu komentatorów zwraca uwagę, że początek naszej paraszy zdaje się celowo kontrastować gościnność Abrahama i Sary wobec przybyszów z amoralnym zachowaniem mieszkańców Sodomy, pragnących wykorzystać gości Lota seksualnie. Twierdzą oni, że głównym grzechem mieszkańców Sodomy i Gomory była przemoc wobec przybyszów i wędrowców, osób pozbawionych ochrony wynikającej z członkostwa w miejscowej społeczności.

Tradycja rabiniczna postuluje, że pogarda i przemoc wobec słabszych stały się częścią systemu prawnego Sodomy. Między innymi, prawo Sodomy nakazywało osobom zranionym płacić ich oprawcom za zadane im rany. Pomoc słabym i biednym została zakazana i obłożona surowymi karami.
Sodoma i Gomora zostały zatem zniszczone nie ze względu na okazjonalne akty przemocy wobec potrzebujących i słabszych; ich los przypieczętowały prawa określane przez miejski samorząd.
Współczesne samorządy nie mają na szczęście mandatu pozwalającego im karać słabych za ich słabości. Mogą one jednak realizować politykę de facto faworyzującą pewne grupy w społeczeństwie. Przykładowo, mogą one pozwalać deweloperom na zabudowę miejskich terenów zielonych, obcinać wydatki na MOPS-y i mieszkania socjalne jako pierwsze w ramach „oszczędności”, budować miasto przyjazne wyłącznie kierowcom czy zamykać Miejskie Ośrodki Kultury. Żadne z tych działań samo w sobie nie czyni miasta nienadającym się do życia. Spróbujcie sobie jednak wyobrazić miasto, w którym dostęp do zieleni miejskiej, kultury, świadczeń społecznych i komunikacji miejskiej mają tylko bogaci. Czy nie przypominałoby ono Sodomy z Księgi Ezekiela i literatury rabinicznej? Czy nie byłoby okropnym miejscem do życia?

W przeciwieństwie do Lota, niemającego wpływu na normy zachowania obowiązujące w Sodomie, my – współcześni wyborcy – mamy wpływ na politykę miejską. Od nas zależy, czy będziemy na bieżąco reagować na postanowienia rady miasta i dzielnicy mające bezpośredni wpływ na nasze życie. Jest to z całą pewnością bardziej męczące niż postawienie krzyżyka na karcie do głosowania. Na dłuższą metę, nasze aktywne zainteresowanie samorządem może uczynić nasze miejsca zamieszkania lepszymi. Niech tak się stanie – ken jehi racon!

 

I Szabat Szalom.

Mati Kirschenbaum