SIMCHAT TORAH 5781

SIMCHAT TORAH 5781

Rabbi Dr. Walter Rothschild

Simchat Torah is not really important in the Torah itself! There is a sequence of festivals starting with Rosh Hashanah and then Yom Kippur and then Sukkot, and at the end of this latter comes an ”Eighth Day marking the End, the Closure” – ‘Shemini Atzeret’. But the Rabbis of the Mishnaic period introduced – very importantly – a principle of regular readings from the Torah  in their meetings – you can find details of some of the discussions in the Mishnah, Tractate Megillah – they did not refer to chapters and verses, since these were introduced into the Bible text only much later, but instead would say something like ”We start from where it says ”And Moses said…” and everyone present would know what they were talking about! Of course, being a Jewish issue, there were different opinions and different methods – the Rabbis of the diaspora of Iraq decided to read the entire Five Books through each year, whilst those in the Holy Land decided to take three years over it but – here is the point – following the same calendar, just taking in one year the first third of the ”sidra” or ”parasha”, the second year the second third, and – well, I am sure you can work out the rest. This means that in all communities the sidra ‘Bereshit’ would be read on the same week, even if in some places they read the whole lot – what we NOW call Genesis 1:1 to 6:8 – and in others only a shorter section each time. Nowadays the three-year cycle has become the norm in Progressive communities. Every now and then there are calendrical hiccups were two shorter portions have to be combined or, because a festival falls on a Shabbat, the routine cycle is disrupted.

Interestingly they decided to start and end this cycle not with Rosh Hashanah but when all the fuss of the High Holy Days with the special readings was past – i.e. at Shemini Atzeret – and significant also is that this day acquired the name, not of ‘the Day of the Torah’ but the ‘JOY of the Torah’ – Simchat Torah. This reflects to some extent the command to enjoy the entire Festival of Sukkot – ”vesamachta” – ”you shall be happy” – quite a hard thing to achieve over an entire week!

Some then said that one had to be careful not to give the (mistaken) impression that the communal joy was at having finished the Torah and so the custom arose of immediately beginning again with the first chapters of Genesis, to show that the joy is at the ability to start the next cycle of readings! This would be to some extent a Jewish equivalent of the Roman ‘Janus’ figure, facing backwards and forwards at the same time (hence the name of the month ‘January’). Other rituals also developed, such as calling up groups of people to the Aliyot or a ‘Bridegroom of the Torah’ to recite the final blessings and then another ‘Bridegroom of Bereshit’ to recite the first ones of the new cycle – once more, in Progressive communities we apply our egalitarian principles here. There would be processions (‘Hakkafot’), flags could be waved, sweets distributed to the children, and a general party could be celebrated.

here is much to be learned from this cyclical concept. For example, that if a world can have a Beginning, it can also (theoretically) have an End. Only God is eternal, not the things God has created. Also, that even if a great leader like Moses can achieve so much, he must also accept his mortality and leave the book before the actual final verse. But also, how important it is to have a book of Laws – even if they are open to interpretation, they provide a basis for our relationship to our world, our Creator and ourselves. I recently read an account of wartime atrocities in Sumatra and other parts of the Far East and one of the things that struck me was that the Japanese soldiers who drove so many Allied prisoners of war but also Indians, Malays, Thais and other slave workers to their deaths through starvation, lack of medical care, and sheer brutality, when the war was over could simply not see that they had done anything wrong. When challenged and accused of having commited war crimes they did not think of themselves as ‘evil’ or as having behaved inappropriately – this was simply what one did to prisoners over whom one had control. They had not been taught any different. We can see in European history of course many similar examples of those who considered that they were free to treat animals and ‘Untermenschen’ in any way they chose, with no sense of moral control. In this case those concerned had often been exposed to the Biblical traditions but had chosen to ignore them. Europe also saw, centuries earlier, conflicts between Christians and Heathens – those who believed in blood and the sword, who considered that one could enslave or massacre the defeated and rape their wives….  Alas there are parts of the Near East where such practices seem still to be horribly normal. What does this tell us? That a society NEEDS a book of laws and that, unless anyone can show me a truly better one from the period, the Torah is in fact the best there is, the one that teaches us to respect all of Creation, to understand how different nations with their cultures and languages, different levels of human society, rich and poor, free or slave, all have their roots in the same beginnings and that even animals have rights.

We have the Torah. When we read from it we thank God for giving it to us (not for ”having given it” to us, for the act of revealing the Torah remains a continuous process) and this Torah tells us who we are, how the world in which we live came into being, how we became a nation, how we were promised a place to settle, how we are responsible for one another, how we are to communicate to God if we wish  – yes, many details are left vague and open to commentary and interpretation and circumstances sometimes change the specific details, but that is no bad thing, it is still the principle that counts. We are a people who live according to a set of laws which define who we are and how we relate to ourselves and to each other. No other human being can replace God or set himself up as God, not even a leader, not even a patriarch, not even a prophet. The Torah tells us that human beings are defined by the ability to distinguish between Good and Evil, we are not mere creatures of animal instinct – or at least, we should not be.

Law alone is not enough and the Torah is much, much more than a set of laws and ritual instructions, but these are nevertheless important to any group of people that wishes to develop and maintain its own identity. We define ourselves as a people descended from Abraham, a man chosen by God to be his messenger of monotheism, and later of those led from slavery by a man, Moses,  chosen by God to lead the fugitives to the intended destination; we define ourselves by the calendar of important days in the week and in the year, by the things we choose to eat and not to eat, by the way we establish and live with our own families and with other families. Even this brief description is only a small fraction of what we have to be happy about. We read of the ability to talk to God, to plead with God and to argue with God. We read of human passions, human endeavours, human dreams and human limitations. ”Turn it this way and that way,” said the Rabbis, ”For everything is in it.” It is not a mere fundamentalist statement to agree with them. It is a statement of faith and of gratitude.

So – although this year meeting together is not permitted, nor dancing with scrolls and processing in the community, although this year the festival is to be celebrated in a much more limited, individual, isolated, socially-distanced manner – alas – we are still called upon to be Happy because: We have the Torah. Let us not underestimate what that means!

 

Shalom, Chag Sameach

Rabbi Dr. Walter Rothschild

SIMCHAT TORA 5781

SIMCHAT TORA 5781

Rabin dr Walter Rothschild

Simchat Tora nie odgrywa tak naprawdę dużego znaczenia w samej Torze! Mamy serię świąt rozpoczynającą się od Rosz Haszana, potem Jom Kipur, a potem Sukot, zaś na końcu tego ostatniego święta mamy „Ósmy Dzień, Obchody Końca, Zamknięcie” – „Szmini Aceret”. Jednak rabini okresu misznaickiego wprowadzili – co bardzo ważne – zasadę regularnego czytania Tory podczas ich spotkań – szczegóły niektórych ich dyskusji można znaleźć w Misznie w traktacie Megila. Nie odnosili się do rozdziałów i wersetów, jako że te zostały dodane do tekstu biblijnego dopiero o wiele później; zamiast tego mówili coś w stylu: „Zaczynamy od miejsca, gdzie napisano: „I Mojżesz powiedział…”, i wszyscy obecni wiedzieli, o czym mowa! Oczywiście, jako że mamy do czynienia z zagadnieniem żydowskim, pojawiły się różne opinie i różne metody – rabini z diaspory w Iraku postanowili czytać cały Pięcioksiąg w ciągu jednego roku, podczas gdy ci w Ziemi Świętej uznali, że poświęcą na to trzy lata, ale – i to jest ważne – przestrzegali tego samego kalendarza, tyle że w pierwszym roku czytali jedną trzecią „sidry” czy też „paraszy”, w drugim roku kolejną jedną trzecią, a w trzecim… – cóż, na pewno potraficie dopowiedzieć sobie resztę. Oznacza to, że we wszystkich społecznościach sidra „Bereszit” była odczytywana w tym samym tygodniu, nawet jeśli w niektórych miejscach odczytywano całość – to, co my TERAZ nazywamy Rdz 1, 1 – 6, 8, zaś w innych miejscach odczytywano za każdym razem tylko krótszy fragment. Obecnie cykl trzyletni stał się normą w postępowych społecznościach. Co jakiś czas zdarzają się pewne zakłócenia w kalendarzu, jeśli trzeba połączyć dwie krótsze porcje albo w przypadku, jeśli święto przypada w szabat i zwyczajowy cykl zostaje zakłócony.

Co ciekawe, postanowili zaczynać i kończyć cykl czytań nie w Rosz Haszana, lecz wtedy, gdy minie już całe zamieszanie związane ze specjalnymi czytaniami w Straszne Dni – czyli dopiero w Szmini Aceret. Ważny jest również fakt, iż ten dzień uzyskał nazwę – nie „Dzień Tory”, ale „RADOŚĆ Tory” – Simchat Tora. Odzwierciedla to do pewnego stopnia przykazanie, żeby radować się całym świętem Sukot – „wesamachta” – „będziesz radosny” – co jest dość trudne do osiągnięcia przez cały tydzień!

Niektórzy uznali potem, że trzeba uważać, żeby nie zasugerować nikomu (niezgodnie z prawdą), że wspólnota raduje się z powodu zakończenia czytania Tory, a zatem pojawił się zwyczaj, żeby natychmiast zaczynać czytać od nowa pierwsze rozdziały księgi Rodzaju, tak aby pokazać, że powodem do radości jest możliwość rozpoczęcia kolejnego cyklu czytań! Byłby to do pewnego stopnia żydowski odpowiednik rzymskiej figury „Janusa”, patrzącej jednocześnie w tył i w przód (stąd też wywodzi się angielska nazwa miesiąca styczeń – January). Wykształciły się również inne rytuały, takie jak wzywanie różnych grup osób do alijot albo zwyczaj, zgodnie z którym „Oblubieniec Tory” recytuje końcowe błogosławieństwa, a potem ktoś inny – „Oblubieniec Bereszit” – recytuje pierwsze błogosławieństwa nowego cyklu – również i w tym przypadku w postępowych kongregacjach stosujemy egalitarne zasady. Odbywają się procesje („hakafot”), czasem macha się flagami, dzieciom rozdaje się słodycze i ogólnie rzecz biorąc świętuje się.

Ta koncepcja cykliczności może nas wiele nauczyć. Na przykład, że jeśli świat może mieć początek, to może również (teoretycznie) mieć koniec. Tylko Bóg jest wieczny, a nie stworzone przez Niego rzeczy. Jak również, że pomimo iż Mojżesz, wielki przywódca, tak wiele osiągnął, to i tak musiał zaakceptować fakt, iż jest śmiertelny i musiał zejść ze stron księgi przed końcowym wersetem. Uczy nas to również, jak ważne jest, żeby mieć księgę Praw – nawet jeśli są otwarte na interpretacje, to zapewniają podstawę dla naszych relacji z naszym światem, naszym Stwórcą i nami samymi. Niedawno czytałem relację o zbrodniach wojennych na Sumatrze i w innych częściach Dalekiego Wschodu, i uderzyła mnie jedna rzecz – że japońscy żołnierze, którzy doprowadzili do śmierci tak wielu jeńców alianckich, ale również Hindusów, Malajów, Tajlandczyków i innych niewolniczych pracowników poprzez zagłodzenie, brak opieki medycznej i czystą brutalność, po zakończeniu wojny nie byli w stanie dostrzec, że zrobili coś złego. Kiedy skonfrontowano ich i oskarżono o popełnienie zbrodni wojennych, nie myśleli o sobie jako o „złych” albo zachowujących się w nieodpowiedni sposób – tak się po prostu postępowało z jeńcami, nad którymi sprawowało się kontrolę. Nikt nie nauczył ich innego postępowania. W historii europejskiej możemy oczywiście wskazać wiele podobnych przykładów osób, które uważały, że wolno im traktować zwierzęta i „Untermenschen” jak tylko im się podoba, bez żadnego kompasu moralnego. W takim przypadku sprawcy często mieli styczność z tradycjami biblijnymi, ale zdecydowali się je ignorować. Europa również była świadkiem, stulecia wcześniej, konfliktów pomiędzy chrześcijanami i poganami – tymi, którzy wierzyli w zasadę krwi i miecza i uważali, że można zniewolić albo wymordować przegranych i zgwałcić ich żony…. Niestety są miejsca na Bliskim Wschodzie, gdzie takie praktyki wciąż zdają się być przerażającą normalnością. Co nam to mówi? Że społeczeństwo POTRZEBUJE księgi praw i że, chyba że ktoś jest w stanie wskazać faktycznie lepszą księgę z tego okresu, Tora jest w istocie najlepszą, jaka istnieje – jest księgą, która uczy nas szanować całe Stworzenie i pozwala nam zrozumieć, jak różne narody wraz z ich kulturami i językami, różne warstwy społeczne, bogaci i biedni, wolni i niewolnicy – jak wszyscy są zakorzenieni w tych samych początkach i że nawet zwierzęta mają prawa.

Mamy Torę. Kiedy z niej czytamy, dziękujemy Bogu za to, że nam ją ofiaruje (a nie za to, że nam ją „kiedyś ofiarował”, jako że akt objawienia Tory pozostaje nieustannym procesem) i ta Tora mówi nam, kim jesteśmy, jak powstał świat, w którym żyjemy, jak zostaliśmy narodem, jak obiecano nam miejsce do osiedlenia się, jak jesteśmy odpowiedzialni za siebie nawzajem, jak możemy się komunikować z Bogiem, jeśli tego chcemy – owszem, wiele szczegółów pozostaje niejasnych i podlega komentarzom i interpretacjom, a okoliczności wpływają czasem na zmianę jakichś szczegółów, ale nie ma w tym nic złego, bo wciąż liczy się sama zasada. Jesteśmy ludem, który żyje zgodnie z zestawem praw definiujących, kim jesteśmy i jak się odnosimy do samych siebie i do innych. Żadna istota ludzka nie może zastąpić Boga ani postawić się w miejscu Boga – nawet przywódca, nawet patriarcha, nawet prorok. Tora mówi nam, że ludzi definiuje zdolność rozróżniania pomiędzy dobrem i złem, że nie jesteśmy zaledwie stworzeniami rządzonymi zwierzęcym instynktem – a przynajmniej nie powinniśmy być.

Samo prawo nie jest wystarczające i Tora to coś o wiele, wiele więcej niż zestaw praw i wytycznych rytualnych, niemniej są one ważne dla każdej grupy ludzi, która pragnie rozwijać i utrzymać własną tożsamość. Definiujemy się jako lud wywodzący się od Abrahama, człowieka wybranego przez Boga, aby być Jego posłańcem monoteizmu, a następnie od tych, którzy zostali wyprowadzeni z niewoli przez człowieka – Mojżesza – wybranego przez Boga, aby poprowadził zbiegów do przeznaczonego im miejsca; definiujemy się poprzez kalendarz wskazujący ważne dni w tygodniu i całym roku, poprzez to, co decydujemy się jeść i czego decydujemy się nie jeść, poprzez sposób, w jaki zakładamy rodziny i żyjemy z własnymi rodzinami oraz z innymi rodzinami. Ten krótki opis stanowi zaledwie drobny ułamek powodów, jakie mamy do radości. Czytamy o możliwości rozmawiania z Bogiem, proszenia o coś Boga i spierania się z Nim. Czytamy o ludzkich namiętnościach, o ludzkich staraniach, o ludzkich marzeniach i ludzkich ograniczeniach. „Czytaj ją i czytaj wciąż na nowo” – mówili rabini, „bo wszystko jest w niej zawarte”. Zgodzenie się z nimi nie jest zaledwie jakąś fundamentalistyczną deklaracją. Jest to deklaracja wiary i wdzięczności.

Tak więc – choć w tym roku nie są dozwolone wspólne spotkania, tańczenie ze zwojami ani wspólnotowe procesje; choć w tym roku święto będzie obchodzone – niestety – w o wiele bardziej ograniczony, indywidualny, odizolowany, zdystansowany społecznie sposób – to i tak wzywa się nas do radości – bo mamy Torę. Doceńmy znaczenie tego faktu!

Szalom, Chag Sameach,

Rabbi Dr. Walter Rothschild

Tłum. Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Nitzavim-Vayelech

 Open your heart to receive blessing

Thoughts on parashat Nitzavim-Vayelech

Menachem Mirski

Human beings are religious beings. This means we have a natural tendency to develop religion or something that metaphysically deals with the problematic mystery of human  existence. Every time human beings want to get rid of religion something else fills this gap and becomes a new religion. This new religion is usually a political ideology, an ideologized science or a random stream of philosophy that was accidentally popular at the time.

The problem is that what is metaphysical cannot be replaced with something physical, scientific or political. Whenever humanity tries to do so it hurts itself in the long run.

Conceaed acts concern the LORD our God; but with overt acts, it is for us and our children ever to apply all the provisions of this Teaching. (Deuteronomy 29:28)

We cannot repress or get rid of our metaphysical needs. We cannot escape from our need for transcendence. Why? Because by repressing things that concern our God we will end up, sooner or later, in self denial and nihilism. We were created in divine likeness which means we naturally strive for the divine. Our religious drive is a drive for something holy and eternal – something that is good, something that does not pass. This eternal and good thing has to be able to mark everything we freely do and experience- mark with meaning.

To mark means to affirm, not to subject – and no science, no political ideology nor philosophy is able to fully do that. Why? because the products of human intellect are, by definition, limited. Science and philosophy can give you explanation, political ideology can give you the goal. Religion gives you meaning.

At the end of the day human intellect is there to serve, to make our lives easier, more comfortable and more predictable. Religion very often does the opposite or at least starts with the opposite. Judaism, our religion, does not unconditionally affirm our life. It affirms it deeply, but only when we bring holiness, good and justice. It affirms life with a spirit that deliberately opens itself towards unknown and concealed things. None of these concealed things, nor holiness nor good are the notions that can be politically or scientifically defined without reducing them to fractions.

When all these things befall you—the blessing and the curse that I have set before you—and you take them to heart amidst the various nations to which the LORD your God has banished you, and you return to the LORD your God, and you and your children heed His command with all your heart and soul, just as I enjoin upon you this day, then the LORD your God will restore your fortunes and take you back in love. He will bring you together again from all the peoples where the LORD your God has scattered you. Even if your outcasts are at the ends of the world, from there the LORD your God will gather you, from there He will fetch you. And the LORD your God will bring you to the land that your fathers possessed, and you shall possess it; and He will make you more prosperous and more numerous than your fathers. Then the LORD your God will open up your heart and the hearts of your offspring to love the LORD your God with all your heart and soul, in order that you may live. (Deuteronomy 30:1-6)

These words contain an endless, divine promise. Note, they don’t make many conditions. There is only one essential: we have to return to God, to everything He revealed to us on Mount Sinai.

Everything that is concealed is known by God. During the coming High Holidays I encourage all of you to express everything that is concealed in us before Him, with our entire hearts and entire souls. If we do that He will turn His countenance towards us and will bless us with all His generosity.

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Nicawim-Wajelech

Otwórz swoje serce, żeby otrzymać błogosławieństwo

Refleksja nad paraszą Nicawim-Wajelech

Menachem Mirski 

Ludzie są istotami religijnymi. Oznacza to, że mamy naturalną skłonność do tworzenia religii albo czegoś, co zajmuje się od strony metafizycznej  problematyczną tajemnicą ludzkiej egzystencji. Za każdym razem, kiedy ludzie chcą się pozbyć religii, coś innego wypełnia tę lukę i staje się nową religią. Tą nową religią jest zwykle jakaś ideologia polityczna, zideologizowana nauka albo przypadkowy nurt filozoficzny, który był akurat popularny w owym czasie.

Problem polega na tym, że tego, co metafizyczne, nie da się zastąpić czymś fizycznym, naukowym albo politycznym. Ilekroć ludzkość próbuje tak uczynić, wyrządza sobie na dłuższą metę krzywdę.

To, co jest zakryte, należy do Pana, Boga naszego, a co jest jawne, do nas i do naszych [dzieci] po wieczne czasy, abyśmy wypełniali wszystkie słowa tego [nauczania].

(Pwt 29, 28)

Nie możemy tłumić ani pozbyć się naszych potrzeb metafizycznych. Nie możemy uciec od naszej potrzeby transcendencji. Dlaczego? Dlatego, że tłumienie przez nas rzeczy, które należą do naszego Boga skończy się, prędzej czy później, zaprzeczeniem naszej własnej istocie i nihilizmem. Zostaliśmy stworzeni na boże podobieństwo, co oznacza, że w naturalny sposób dążymy do tego, co boskie. Nasze dążenia religijne są dążeniem do czegoś świętego i wiecznego – czegoś, co jest dobre, czegoś, co nie przemija. Ta wieczna i dobra rzecz musi być w stanie naznaczyć wszystko, co sami z siebie robimy i czego doświadczamy – naznaczać to znaczeniem.

Naznaczać oznacza afirmować, a nie podporządkowywać – i żadna nauka, żadna ideologia polityczna ani filozofia nie jest w stanie w pełni tego dokonać. Dlaczego? Gdyż wytwory ludzkiego intelektu są, z definicji, ograniczone. Nauka i filozofia mogą zaoferować ci wyjaśnienie, a ideologia polityczna może dać ci cel. Religia daje ci znaczenie.

Koniec końców ludzki intelekt jest po to, aby służyć, aby ułatwiać nam życie i czynić je wygodniejszym i bardziej przewidywalnym. Religia bardzo często robi coś przeciwnego albo przynajmniej zaczyna się od czegoś przeciwnego. Judaizm, nasza religia, nie afirmuje naszego życia bezwarunkowo. Afirmuje je głęboko, ale tylko wtedy, kiedy wnosimy świętość, dobro i sprawiedliwość.  Afirmuje życie z duchowością, która celowo otwiera się na nieznane i ukryte rzeczy. Żadna z tych ukrytych rzeczy ani świętość czy też dobro nie są koncepcjami, które można by zdefiniować politycznie albo naukowo bez rozłożenia ich na części.

Gdy tedy przyjdzie na cię to wszystko, błogosławieństwo i przekleństwo, które ci przedłożyłem, i weźmiesz je sobie do serca pośród wszystkich narodów, dokąd wypędzi cię Pan, Bóg twój, i nawrócisz się do Pana, Boga twego, i będziesz słuchał jego głosu zgodnie z tym wszystkim, co ja ci dziś nakazuję, ty i twoje [dzieci], z całego serca twego i z całej duszy twojej, to wtedy przywróci Pan, Bóg twój, twoich jeńców i zmiłuje się nad tobą, i zgromadzi cię z powrotem ze wszystkich ludów, gdzie cię rozproszył Pan, Bóg twój. Choćby twoi wygnańcy byli na krańcu nieba, to i stamtąd zgromadzi cię Pan, Bóg twój, i stamtąd cię zabierze, i sprowadzi cię Pan, Bóg twój, do ziemi, którą posiadali twoi ojcowie, i posiądziesz ją i ty, i uczyni cię szczęśliwszym i liczniejszym od twoich ojców. I [otworzy] Pan, Bóg twój, twoje serce i serce twego potomstwa, abyś miłował Pana, Boga twego, z całego serca twego i z całej duszy twojej, abyś żył. (Pwt 30, 1-6)

Te słowa zawierają nieskończoną, bożą obietnicę. Zauważmy, że nie stawiają one wielu warunków. Jest tylko jeden, zasadniczy warunek: musimy powrócić do Boga, do wszystkiego, co On nam wyjawił na Górze Synaj.

Wszystko, co jest ukryte, jest znane Bogu. Podczas nadchodzących Wielkich Świąt zachęcam was wszystkich do wyrażania przed Nim wszystkiego, co jest w nas ukryte, z całych naszych serc i z całych naszych dusz. Jeśli to zrobimy, On zwróci ku nam swe oblicze i pobłogosławi nas całą swoją szczodrością.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Menachem Mirski 10 przykazań – część 3 wykład wideo

10 przykazań – część 3

Cykl trzech wykładów Menechama Mirskiego na temat 10 przykazań.

Menachem Mirski jest studentem rabinackim w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Cedaka צדקה
PAYPAL paypal.me/BeitPolska Beit
Polska – Związek Postępowych Gmin Żydowskich nr konta: 47 1240 1040 1111 0010 3311 7066 Bank Pekao S.A. Tytuł: Darowizna na cele statutowe

Zrealizowano przy wsparciu Dutch Humanitarian Fund

Menachem Mirski 10 przykazań – część 2 wykład wideo

10 przykazań – część 2

Cykl trzech wykładów Menechama Mirskiego na temat 10 przykazań.

Menachem Mirski jest studentem rabinackim w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Cedaka צדקה
PAYPAL paypal.me/BeitPolska Beit
Polska – Związek Postępowych Gmin Żydowskich nr konta: 47 1240 1040 1111 0010 3311 7066 Bank Pekao S.A. Tytuł: Darowizna na cele statutowe

Zrealizowano przy wsparciu Dutch Humanitarian Fund

TRZY KSIĘGI OTWIERA SIĘ W ROSZ HA-SZANA – wykład wideo

TRZY KSIĘGI OTWIERA SIĘ W ROSZ HA-SZANA

Wykład Miriam Klimovej z dnia 19.08.2020.
Ostatni z serii wykładów poświęconych modlitwie prowadzonych przez Miriam Klimovą, studentkę rabinacką Israeli Rabbinic Program at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, Jerusalem, Israel.
Cedaka צדקה
PAYPAL paypal.me/BeitPolska Beit
Polska – Związek Postępowych Gmin Żydowskich nr konta: 47 1240 1040 1111 0010 3311 7066 Bank Pekao S.A. Tytuł: Darowizna na cele statutowe

Zrealizowano przy wsparciu Dutch Humanitarian Fund

TU BE-AW -OD ŻAŁOBY DO MIŁOŚCI

TU BE-AW -OD ŻAŁOBY DO MIŁOŚCI

Wykład Miriam Klimovej z dnia 05.08.2020.

#אהבה Mówili mi, że w każdym języku brzmi inaczej. Może powód jest taki, że każdy język ma swoją nutę? Choć nie można pozbyć się akcentu, melodię można śpiewać. Oto lekcja (po polsku), w której opowiedziałam o Tu B ‘Av – święcie miłości i strasznej traumy, kobietach w białych ubraniach, darmowym tańcu i niebezpieczeństwie kryjącym się za nim, anulowaniu hierarchii, ale tylko rzekomo, i wielka nadzieja na równość i braterstwo.

Kolejny  z serii wykładów poświęconych modlitwie prowadzonych przez Miriam Klimovą, studentkę rabinacką Israeli Rabbinic Program at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, Jerusalem, Israel.
Cedaka צדקה
PAYPAL paypal.me/BeitPolska Beit
Polska – Związek Postępowych Gmin Żydowskich nr konta: 47 1240 1040 1111 0010 3311 7066 Bank Pekao S.A. Tytuł: Darowizna na cele statutowe

Zrealizowano przy wsparciu Dutch Humanitarian Fund

Devarim

An atheist’s guide to prayer

Thoughts on parashat Devarim

Menachem Mirski

Prayer is the salient expression of religious emotion and of man’s relationship with God. Presumably every religious person has asked themselves this question: how much prayer do I need in my life and does it make my connection to God stronger? There may be many answers to this question. One analysis may be: I need to make teshuvah, come closer to God and use religion to organize my life because when I let the world rule my life it brought me chaos and suffering and deprived me of meaning. Alternatively one might muse: I need to focus on action, not prayer. I don’t need to spend that much time in the synagogue and I don’t need to pray all the time. I already have learned what I need to know and now it’s time for action!

The Torah portion for this week suggests the latter:

The LORD our God spoke to us at Horeb, saying: You have stayed long enough at this mountain. Start out and make your way to the hill country of the Amorites and to all their neighbors in the Arabah, the hill country, the Shephelah, the Negeb, the seacoast, the land of the Canaanites, and the Lebanon, as far as the Great River, the river Euphrates. See, I place the land at your disposal. Go, take possession of the land that the LORD swore to your fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to assign to them and to their heirs after them. (Deuteronomy 1:6-8)

The revelation on Sinai is complete. The Israelites have their instructions. Now is the time to go and implement the Divine plan. Notwithstanding, are they commanded to drop spirituality, conquer the land and immerse themselves in practical life exclusively? No, not by a long shot. God will accompany them throughout their mission and beyond. The instructions they received in Sinai clearly state their duties to God, such as obeying his laws, the Sabbath, and making sacrifices to him, etc. Forever, they will be His witnesses and He will be their witness.

It is not uncommon today to hear people explain that they are not religious, but they are ‘enlightened’ or ‘spiritual.’ They explain that they don’t need prayer or even God because, they say, it is enough to ‘live in harmony with the universe,’ thus claiming “the God hypothesis” is redundant. Yes, we all know that prayer alone in life is not enough and that to achieve anything in life action is required. But is prayer really unnecessary? Let’s look at this in practice. Imagine I am up for a promotion at work. I pray to God for it but I also know that my promotion won’t happen without my hard work. So in harmony with my prayers, I work hard to impress my boss. What if I get this promotion? Is it because of God’s blessing or simply a result of my hard work? What if I don’t get the promotion? Was it not God’s will? Taking the argument a step further, if we believe things happen because of God’s will anyway then…. what’s the point of praying? Wouldn’t it better to just work in harmony with the universe and simply reap what we earn?

Let’s consider first two incorrect assumptions about (petitionary) prayer in the argument above. First, the person is incorrectly understanding prayer as a kind of magic, believing that you can influence reality with just words and thoughts and God is just a mere element in the process. Another incorrect assumption is that since we cannot measure the exact impact of the Divine action it doesn’t play any role in the entire process.

Sometimes we indeed have a feeling that we don’t need a prayer to achieve something. The task is clear and everything seems dependent on us. But there are other times where we feel that prayer is a necessary part of the process. In these situations we usually know that the goal we want to achieve is attainable, but at the same time we are aware there may be some obstacles and complications on the way that we will need to overcome. We often don’t know what these obstacles will be and we do know that not everything is dependent on us. That is when we need prayer to ensure us that despite the obstacles, we will achieve the goal.

Now, what about those who don’t believe in a higher power? Why should they pray? It turns out prayer is kind of magical – its superpower lies in its ability to harness the mind. Prayer is a great source of strength and motivation. It’s helpful in getting the right mindset and prioritizing things. By getting into a right mindset and setting priorities properly we avoid procrastination. Prayer prevents us from going astray, from giving up. Prayer continuously ensures us that the goal we want to achieve is worthy and meaningful and all the obstacles we will face will cease to exist and at the end of our journey we won’t even remember them. Prayer, when supported by reason and experience, makes us more cautious, sensitive and prevents us from making obvious mistakes.

Prayer also, amazingly, stimulates self-reflection: why didn’t I achieve this or that? It is often the case that the reasons for which I haven’t achieved something were in fact in me, not in the universe. I thought that the universe conspired against me, but after some time I realized that the main obstacles were in fact in me: in my habits, in my behavior, in my wrong priorities, bad time management, in my hierarchy of values, in the choice of pleasures that I pursued, in my erroneous thinking, in my arrogance, in my lack of faith, in my laziness or ignorance. This life wisdom I achieved was and is facilitated through prayer. Regular prayer helps to eliminate the obstacles within ourselves, obstacles that are often more relevant than the objective challenges that we face. In the context of prayer we also ask ourselves questions about what we have achieved and what we want to achieve. These are important questions at any stage of life and they are questions that should be pondered regularly. Quite simply regular prayer promotes this type of internal analysis.

Prayer also helps tremendously when we experience failure. When this connection is supported by reason and experience it will enlighten the reasons of your failure. You can discover the meaning behind the failure.

Finally, and above all prayer connects you with God and to a moral system around which you orbit. This connection tells you that your life and your goals are not only about you.

By praying we learn to control our internal, spiritual life. Control of our inner life is essential to having true control over our lives in general and the circumstances in which we live. Often things that happen ‘to us’ are, in fact, a combination of both independent objective circumstances and our reactions to them. The more considerable and meaningful are our responses, the more power we gain over the circumstances and their outcome. In this way we expand the borders of our freedom. Through prayer we can come to understand the complexities of the situations we are faced and the positive and negative consequences that ensue.

 

It was a lack of faith and close contact with God that delayed the Israelites’ entry into the Promised Land by 40 years. Thus any call to action should be understood as a call to action with prayer. Sincere prayer improves the quality of our actions and our experience. And every prayer is heard, one way or another.

 

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Dewarim

Przewodnik po modlitwie dla ateisty

Refleksja nad paraszą Dewarim

Menachem Mirski 

Modlitwa stanowi ważny wyraz uczuć religijnych oraz relacji człowieka z Bogiem. Przypuszczalnie każda religijna osoba zadała sobie następujące pytanie: ile modlitwy potrzebuję w moim życiu i czy wzmacnia ona moją więź z Bogiem? Może być wiele odpowiedzi na to pytanie. Jedno możliwe podejście jest następujące: muszę dokonać tszuwy, zbliżyć się do Boga i wykorzystać religię, żeby zorganizować moje życie, bo kiedy pozwalam, żeby to świat rządził moim życiem, przynosi mi to chaos i cierpienie i pozbawia mnie poczucia sensu. Alternatywnie można też myśleć następująco: muszę się skupić na działaniu, a nie na modlitwie. Nie potrzebuję spędzać tak dużo czasu w synagodze i nie potrzebuję cały czas się modlić. Już się nauczyłem tego, co jest mi potrzebne, a teraz nadszedł czas na działanie!

Czytana w tym tygodniu porcja Tory sugeruje tę drugą odpowiedź:

Pan, nasz Bóg, przemówił do nas na Horebie: Już dosyć waszego pobytu na tej górze. Wyruszcie więc i idźcie w stronę gór Amorejczyków i do wszystkich ich sąsiadów w Araba, na pogórzu i na nizinie, w Negebie i na wybrzeżu morza, do ziemi Kananejczyków i Libanu, aż do wielkiej rzeki, rzeki Eufratu.  Oto przekazałem wam tę ziemię, która jest przed wami. Wejdźcie do niej i weźcie w posiadanie tę ziemię, którą Pan przysiągł dać waszym ojcom, Abrahamowi, Izaakowi, i Jakubowi oraz ich potomstwu po nich. (Pwt 1, 6-8)

Objawienie na Synaju dobiegło już końca. Izraelici otrzymali swoje wytyczne.  Teraz nadszedł czas, żeby iść i wdrożyć w życie boży plan. Czy jednak nakazuje im się, żeby porzucili duchowość, podbili ziemię i zajęli się wyłącznie praktycznymi sprawami? Nie, w żadnym wypadku. Bóg będzie im towarzyszył przez całą ich misję i po jej zakończeniu. Wytyczne, jakie otrzymali na Synaju wyraźnie wymieniają ich obowiązki wobec Boga, takie jak przestrzeganie Jego praw, szabatu, składanie mu ofiar etc. Będą na zawsze Jego świadkami, a On będzie ich świadkiem.

Nierzadko słyszy się dziś, jak ludzie wyjaśniają, że nie są religijni, ale są „oświeceni” czy też „uduchowieni”. Wyjaśniają, że nie potrzebują modlitwy ani nawet Boga, ponieważ, jak mówią, wystarczy „żyć w harmonii z wszechświatem”, twierdząc tym samym, że „hipoteza o istnieniu Boga” jest zbędna. Owszem, wszyscy wiemy, że sama modlitwa nie wystarczy w życiu i że aby cokolwiek w życiu osiągnąć potrzebne jest działanie. Ale czy modlitwa naprawdę nie jest konieczna? Przyjrzyjmy się temu w praktyce. Wyobraźmy sobie, że mam perspektywy na awans w pracy. Modlę się o to do Boga, ale wiem też, że nie dostanę awansu bez mojej ciężkiej pracy. A więc poza samymi modlitwami ciężko pracuję, żeby zrobić dobre wrażenie na moim szefie. Co, jeśli dostanę ten awans? Czy stanie się to dzięki bożemu błogosławieństwu, czy po prostu w efekcie mojej ciężkiej pracy? A co, jeśli nie dostanę awansu? Czy nie było to po prostu wolą Boga? Idąc jeszcze o krok dalej, jeśli wierzymy, że wszystko i tak dzieje się z powodu bożej woli, to…. po co w takim razie się modlić? Czy nie lepiej byłoby po prostu pracować w harmonii ze wszechświatem i po prostu zebrać to, na co sobie zapracujemy?

Omówmy najpierw dwa błędne założenia na temat modlitwy (błagalnej) obecne w powyższym argumencie. Po pierwsze, osoba głosząca taką tezę błędnie postrzega modlitwę jako coś magicznego, wierząc, że możemy wpływać na rzeczywistość przy pomocy samych słów i myśli, a Bóg jest zaledwie pewnym elementem w tym procesie. Kolejne błędne założenie jest takie, że jako iż nie możemy zmierzyć dokładnego wpływu bożych działań, to nie odgrywają one żadnej roli w całym tym procesie.

Czasem faktycznie mamy poczucie, że nie potrzebujemy modlitwy, aby coś osiągnąć. Stojące przed nami zadanie jest jasne i wszystko wydaje się zależeć od nas samych. Ale są też inne sytuacje, kiedy czujemy, że modlitwa jest konieczną częścią procesu. W takich sytuacjach zwykle wiemy, że zakładany przez nas cel  jest osiągalny, ale jednocześnie mamy świadomość, że po drodze możemy natrafić na pewne przeszkody i komplikacje, które będziemy musieli przezwyciężyć.  Często nie wiemy, jakie będą to przeszkody i mamy świadomość, że nie wszystko zależy od nas. Właśnie wtedy potrzebujemy modlitwy, aby się upewnić, że pomimo przeszkód osiągniemy nasz cel.

A co z tymi, którzy nie wierzą w żadną siłę wyższą? Dlaczego mieliby się modlić? Okazuje się, że modlitwa ma swoistą magiczną moc – jej cudowna właściwość polega na jej zdolności do okiełznania umysłu. Modlitwa jest wspaniałym źródłem siły i motywacji. Pomaga osiągnąć odpowiednie nastawienie i nadać rzeczom odpowiedni priorytet. Dzięki osiągnięciu odpowiedniego nastawienia i wyznaczaniu odpowiednich priorytetów unikamy prokrastynacji. Dzięki modlitwie nie zbaczamy z właściwej drogi i nie poddajemy się. Modlitwa zapewnia nas nieustannie, że cel, jaki chcemy osiągnąć, jest wartościowy i znaczący i że wszystkie przeszkody, z jakimi będziemy się mierzyć przestaną istnieć i na końcu naszej wędrówki nie będziemy nawet o nich pamiętać. Modlitwa przy wsparciu rozumu i doświadczenia czyni nas bardziej ostrożnymi i wrażliwymi oraz chroni nas przed popełnieniem oczywistych błędów.

Co więcej, modlitwa pobudza nas też niezwykle do samorefleksji: dlaczego nie udało mi się osiągnąć tego albo tamtego? Często bywa tak, że powody, dla których nie udało mi się czegoś osiągnąć, leżały w rzeczywistości we mnie samym, a nie we wszechświecie. Myślałem, że wszechświat sprzysiągł się przeciwko mnie, ale po jakimś czasie zdałem sobie sprawę, że główne przeszkody leżały w rzeczywistości we mnie samym: w moich nawykach, w moim zachowaniu, w moich niewłaściwych priorytetach, w złym zarządzaniu czasem, w mojej hierarchii wartości, w wyborze przyjemności, za którymi goniłem, w moim błędnym myśleniu, w mojej arogancji, w moim braku wiary, w moim lenistwie albo niewiedzy. Modlitwa ułatwiała i dalej ułatwia korzystanie z takiej mądrości życiowej, jaką udało mi się osiągnąć. Regularna modlitwa pomaga wyeliminować przeszkody obecne w nas samych, przeszkody, które są często bardziej istotne niż obiektywne wyzwania, z jakimi się zmagamy. W kontekście modlitwy zadajemy sobie też pytania na temat tego, co udało nam się osiągnąć i co chcielibyśmy osiągnąć. Są to ważne pytania na każdym etapie życia i są to pytania, nad którymi powinniśmy się regularnie zastanawiać. Regularna modlitwa najzwyczajniej sprzyja tego rodzaju wewnętrznej analizie.

Modlitwa jest też niezwykle pomocna, kiedy doświadczamy porażki. Kiedy ta więź jest wspierana przez rozum i doświadczenie, wyjaśni nam powody naszej porażki i pozwoli nam odkryć stojące za nią znaczenie.

W końcu i przede wszystkim każda modlitwa łączy nas z Bogiem i z systemem moralnym będącym naszym punktem odniesienia. Więź ta mówi nam, że w naszym życiu i w naszych celach nie chodzi tylko o nas samych.

Modląc się, uczymy się kontrolować nasze wewnętrzne życie duchowe. Kontrolowanie naszego życia wewnętrznego jest kluczowe, abyśmy mieli prawdziwą kontrolę nad naszym życiem i nad okolicznościami, w jakich żyjemy. Rzeczy, które „nam się przytrafiają” są często w rzeczywistości połączeniem zarówno niezależnych, obiektywnych okoliczności, jak i naszej reakcji na te okoliczności. Im bardziej przemyślane i znaczące są nasze odpowiedzi, tym większą zyskujemy władzę nad okolicznościami i ich konsekwencjami. W ten sposób poszerzamy granice naszej wolności. Poprzez modlitwę możemy zacząć rozumieć złożony charakter sytuacji, z jakimi się mierzymy oraz wynikające z nich pozytywne i negatywne konsekwencje.

To właśnie brak wiary i bliskiego kontaktu z Bogiem opóźniły wejście Izraelitów do Ziemi Obiecanej o 40 lat. A zatem każde wezwanie do działania powinno być rozumiane jako wezwanie do działania wraz z modlitwą. Szczera modlitwa poprawia jakość naszych działań i naszych doświadczeń. I każda modlitwa zostaje w taki czy inny sposób wysłuchana.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

Tłum. Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka