Acharei Mot

Self-esteem vs. self awareness

Thoughts on parashat Acharei Mot

Menachem Mirski

After the death of Aaron’s two sons, Nadav and Avihu, God instructs Moses regarding the atoning sacrifices to be offered by the kohanim on Yom Kippur:

God said to Moses: Tell your brother Aaron that he is not to come at will into the Shrine behind the curtain, in front of the cover that is upon the ark, lest he die; for I appear in the cloud over the cover. Thus only shall Aaron enter the Shrine: with a bull of the herd for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering. […] And from the Israelite community he shall take two he-goats for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering. Aaron is to offer his own bull of sin offering, to make expiation for himself and for his household. (Leviticus 16:2-6)

What did this expiation look like? Our Sages teach us that it was done through verbal confession of sins:

And the priest places his two hands on the bull and confesses. And this is what he would say in his confession: Please, God, I have sinned, I have done wrong, and I have rebelled before You, I and my family. (Mishna Yoma 3:8)

The Hebrew word for confession, vidui, comes from the verb lehitvadot – to confess – which is in Hebrew a reflexive verb (as, generally speaking, all the verbs of the binyan hitpael). Therefore, according to Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsh, the confession ordained by the Torah does not consist of a confession of sins made to another person; furthermore, it is not even a confession made to God, but as its grammatical reflexive form implies, it is confession in which sinner makes himself aware of his sin:

We should not conceal our past misdemeanors from ourselves but regard them with an unprejudiced eye, without extenuation. We should admit to ourselves that not only should we have acted differently but that it was in our power to have acted differently. By doing this we admit and proclaim our freedom of choice, and when we utter the formula “I have sinned” in all sincerity, we include the idea “I shall not repeat the offence”. (Hirsh on Leviticus 16:4)

Thus, the essence of the confession experience is self-awareness. But self-awareness is also an essential part of all our interpersonal interactions. And here we touch on a significant problem. In the last few decades, starting from the 1970s with Generation X through Generation Y and Z, there has been a real flood of narcissistic and self-centered attitudes, among both men and women. The psychological core of this phenomenon is, in my opinion, low self-awareness regarding certain traits of one’s own character. All of this has its origins in upbringing and has been largely caused by the psychological and socio-cultural concepts openly promoted in the Western culture, such as the concept of self-esteem or other concepts of self-acceptance. These concepts, very often expressed in the form of slogans, like “love yourself”, “everybody is special” etc. seem to be forms of positive, corrective reactions to common, negative socio-cultural practices, to something I would call “the culture of constant degrading and humiliating each other” (someone who grew up in the Polish provinces in the 1980s and 1990s knows what I’m talking about), still present until today in some areas of the Western World. This new (in those days) philosophy of upbringing has definitely had a positive impact on our life, freeing individuals from malice and resentment coming from the social environment. But these doctrines also generate side effects that are profoundly damaging to us, both psychologically and socially. Slogans and concepts of that kind should be applied only to the spheres of human identity – religious, national or sexual. Nobody should be entitled to tell you what you should believe in or to what social group you should belong. However, if we apply these kinds of philosophies to other areas of life, like those pertaining to character or moral issues, they can, and usually do, a lot of damage.

Let’s focus on the self-esteem concept for a moment. It basically teaches you to regard yourself with esteem, no matter what you do or who you are, because it builds your confidence and you need confidence to succeed in your life. Fair enough. But if so, why don’t we just call it confidence? Here is the problem: confidence must be earned. We earn confidence by learning, practicing, working, developing our skills etc. If you just focus on building your confidence it’s likely you will become delusional about yourself. With no connection to reality you can score 90-100% in self-esteem tests, then become an unemployed alcoholic and still score 90-100% in these tests. It is so because the whole point of self-esteem is to be proud of yourself even if there is absolutely no reason to be proud of yourself. Self-esteem can be then called ‘unearned confidence’. It equips you for nothing. It won’t help you at school, it won’t help you at work – it will stifle your career and ambitions, and it will certainly wreck havoc on your relationships. Sure, insecurity and self-doubt can also be damaging but at least there is a chance that they may drive you to be better, in whatever field or area. A person with high self-esteem, also known as narcissist, feels good about himself on the basis of nothing.

We all know self-centered, egotistic people who talk all the time only about themselves. Obviously it’s not a binary issue, we can say that everyone is more or less self-centered. But there are extreme examples in this matter and that’s what I’m focusing on here. Self-centered and narcissistic people often impress others with their life stories, achievements etc. But it is all temporary because that kind of psychological constitution causes many problems. Highly self-centered people constantly overlook or ignore the needs of others. In some cases they don’t even leave other people room to express themselves. By being blind other people’s needs and feelings they inflict emotional harm on them. People like that often have no ability to listen and are more likely to be dismissive of other people’s ideas and thoughts. All of that tremendously affects their connections with other people, particularly the matters of love and friendship, making them incapable of being in long-term love relationships.

On top of that highly self-centered people often have a tendency to overlook their flaws and sins. But being self-centered or narcissistic doesn’t make you by definition a bad person. It’s often difficult to qualify their behavior morally, as something bad or morally questionable. Highly narcissistic or egocentric people may be morally ok and may be right in their moral judgments about themselves: “I don’t steal, I don’t lie, I have never tried to seduce a married person… So what’s the problem?” Therefore, we often don’t have moral tools to judge them or to inspire them to change their behavior. The only remedy for this is self-awareness, which often takes years to develop. But this is where our tradition can be of great help for us: it constantly makes us more social, more sensitive to the needs of others and it contains a lot of wisdom in this matter.

 Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

 

Acharei Mot

Samoocena a samoświadomość

Refleksja nad paraszą Acharei Mot

Menachem Mirski 

Po śmierci dwóch synów Aarona, Nadaba i Abihu, Bóg poucza Mojżesza o ofiarach przebłagalnych, które miały być składane przez kohanim w Jom Kippur:

Wiekuisty powiedział do Mojżesza: «Powiedz Aaronowi, swojemu bratu, żeby nie w każdym czasie wchodził do Miejsca Najświętszego poza zasłonę, przed przebłagalnię, która jest na arce, aby nie umarł, kiedy będę się ukazywać w obłoku nad przebłagalnią. Oto jak Aaron będzie wchodzić do Miejsca Najświętszego: weźmie młodego cielca na ofiarę przebłagalną i barana na ofiarę całopalną. Od społeczności Izraelitów weźmie dwa kozły na ofiarę przebłagalną i jednego barana na ofiarę całopalną. Potem Aaron przyprowadzi cielca na ofiarę przebłagalną za siebie samego i dokona przebłagania za siebie i za swój dom. (Kpł 16:2-6)

Jak wyglądało owo przebłaganie, owa ekspiacja? Nasi Mędrcy uczą nas, że dokonywano jej  poprzez ustne wyznanie grzechów:

Kapłan kładzie obie ręce na byku i spowiada się. I oto, co mówi w swoim wyznaniu: Proszę cię Boże [i wyznaję że] zgrzeszyłem, popełniłem nieprawość oraz czyniłem źle przed obliczem Twoim, [zarówno] ja, jak i [osoby z mojego] domostwa. (Miszna Joma 3:8)

Hebrajskie słowo oznaczające spowiedź, vidui, pochodzi od czasownika lehitvadot – wyznać – który jest w języku hebrajskim czasownikiem zwrotnym (podobnie jak zasadniczo wszystkie czasowniki z binjanu hitpael). W związku z powyższym, zdaniem rabina Samsona Rafaela Hirsza, spowiedź nakazana przez Torę nie polega na wyznaniu grzechów drugiej osobie; więcej, nie chodzi tu nawet o wyznanie grzechów przed samym Bogiem, ale, jak sugeruje owa refleksyjna forma gramatyczna, spowiedź nakazana przez Torę to spowiedź, w której grzesznik uświadamia sobie grzech przed samym sobą:

Nie powinniśmy ukrywać przed sobą naszych przeszłych wykroczeń, lecz patrzeć na nie nieuprzedzonym okiem, bez zamiaru ich łagodzenia. Powinniśmy przed samym sobą przyznać, że nie tylko powinniśmy byli postąpić inaczej, ale również, że było w naszej mocy postąpić inaczej. Czyniąc to, wyznajemy i konstatujemy naszą wolność wyboru, a tym samym kiedy wypowiadamy z całą szczerością formułę „zgrzeszyłem”, zawieramy w niej [także] ideę „nie powtórzę [owego] przestępstwa”. (Komentarz Hirsza odnośnie Kpł 16:4)

Istotą doświadczenia spowiedzi jest zatem samoświadomość. Ale samoświadomość jest również istotną częścią wszystkich naszych interakcji międzyludzkich. I tu dotykamy istotnego problemu. W ostatnich kilku dekadach, począwszy od pokolenia X, poprzez pokolenie Y oraz Z, mamy do czynienia z prawdziwym wysypem postaw narcystycznych i egocentrycznych, zarówno wśród mężczyzn, jak i kobiet. Psychologicznym rdzeniem tego zjawiska jest, w mojej opinii, niska samoświadomość w odniesieniu do pewnych cech własnego charakteru. Wszystko to ma swoje korzenie w wychowaniu i jest w dużej mierze spowodowane przez psychologiczne i społeczno-kulturowe koncepcje otwarcie promowane w kulturze zachodniej, takie jak koncepcje samooceny czy inne koncepcje samoakceptacji. Koncepcje te, bardzo często wyrażane w formie haseł, takich jak „kochaj samego siebie”, „każdy jest wyjątkowy” itp., wydają się być formami pozytywnych, korygujących reakcji na powszechne, negatywne praktyki społeczno-kulturowe, które nazwałbym „kulturą nieustannego gnojenia i poniżania się nawzajem”, które są wciąż obecne do w niektórych rejonach naszego kręgu kulturowego (ktoś, kto wychował się na polskiej prowincji w latach 80 i 90 przypuszczalnie wie, o czym mówię). Owszem, ta nowa (w tamtych czasach) filozofia wychowania zdecydowanie pozytywnie wpłynęła na nasze życie, uwalniając jednostki od złośliwości i resentymentów pochodzących ze społecznego otoczenia. Ale tego rodzaju doktryny generują również skutki uboczne, które są dla nas głęboko szkodliwe, zarówno pod względem psychologicznym, jak i społecznym. Tego rodzaju koncepcje i hasła należy stosować tylko w sferach ludzkiej tożsamości – religijnej, narodowej czy seksualnej. Nikt nie powinien mieć prawa mówić ci, w co powinieneś wierzyć lub do jakiej grupy społecznej powinieneś należeć. Jeśli natomiast stosujemy tego rodzaju filozofię w innych dziedzinach naszego społecznego życia, a w szczególności w kwestiach moralnych lub dotyczących ludzkiego charakteru, tego rodzaju frazesy mogą wyrządzić – i zwykle wyrządzają – wiele szkód.

Skupmy się przez chwilę na koncepcjach poczucia własnej wartości. Z grubsza rzecz biorąc  doradzają one nam poważać i doceniać samych siebie, bez względu na to, co robimy i kim jesteśmy, ponieważ to buduje naszą pewność siebie, bowiem potrzebujemy owej pewności, aby odnieść w życiu sukces. W porządku, dlaczego jednak skoncentrujemy się po prostu na pewności siebie? Rzecz w tym, że na ową pewność siebie trzeba sobie zapracować. Zdobywamy pewność siebie ucząc się, ćwicząc, pracując, rozwijając nasze umiejętności itp. Jeśli skupisz się wyłącznie na rozwijaniu pewności siebie, może ostatecznie skończyć z wieloma urojeniami na swój temat. Nie dbając o to kim rzeczywiście jesteś, możesz uzyskać wspaniałe 90-100% wyniki w testach samooceny, zostać bezrobotnym alkoholikiem i nadal uzyskiwać 90-100% w tych testach. Dzieje się tak, ponieważ celem ostatecznym filozofii poczucia własnej wartości jest bycie z siebie dumnym, nawet jeśli nie ma ku temu absolutnie żadnego powodu. Sztucznie stymulowane poczucie własnej wartości można nazwać „niezasłużoną pewnością siebie”. Nic ci to ostatecznie nie daje,  nie pomoże ci w szkole, nie pomoże ci w pracy, ostatecznie zdusi twoją karierę i ambicje, i z pewnością zrujnuje twoje relacje z innymi ludźmi, w szczególności zaś relacje miłosne. Oczywiście, niepewność, brak wiary i zwątpienie w samego siebie mogą być również szkodliwe; te jednakże przynajmniej mogą cię zmotywować, by stać się kimś lepszym, w jakiejkolwiek dziedzinie. Osoba o wysokiej samoocenie, określana również mianem narcyza, czuje się ze sobą dobrze na podstawie absolutnie niczego.

Przypuszczalnie każdy z nas spotkał na swojej drodze egocentrycznych, narcystycznych ludzi, którzy bez przerwy mówią tylko o sobie. Oczywiście nie jest to kwestia binarna, i można powiedzieć, że każdy człowiek jest w mniejszym lub większym stopniu egocentryczny. Mamy jednak w tej materii przykłady ekstremalne i na tym się tutaj skupiam. Egocentryczni i narcystyczni ludzie często imponują innym swoim życiorysem, osiągnięciami itp. Ale to wszystko jest tymczasowe, ponieważ tego rodzaju psychologiczna konstytucja powoduje wiele problemów. Osoby wysoce egocentryczne nieustannie przeoczają lub ignorują potrzeby innych ludzi. W niektórych, skrajnych przypadkach nie pozostawiają nawet innym miejsca na wyrażenie samych siebie. Będąc ślepym na potrzeby i uczucia innych ludzi wyrządzają im krzywdę emocjonalną. Osoby wysoko egocentryczne zwykle nie potrafią słuchać innych ludzi i w rezultacie lekceważą ich pomysły i idee. Wszystko to ogromnie wpływa na ich relacje z innymi, szczególnie na ich relacje miłosne, co często czyni ich niezdolnymi do pozostania w długotrwałych związkach.

Co więcej, ludzie wysoko egocentryczni mają często tendencję do przeoczenia swoich wad i grzechów. Jednakże bycie egocentrycznym lub narcystycznym nie czyni cię z definicji złym człowiekiem. Bardzo często trudno jest zakwalifikować moralnie tego rodzaju zachowania jako złe lub choćby moralnie wątpliwe. Osoba wysoko narcystyczna może być moralnie w porządku i może mieć rację w moralnej ocenie samej siebie: „Nie kradnę, nie kłamię, nigdy nie próbowałem uwieść kogoś zamężnego/żonatego… Więc w czym problem?”. Dlatego często nie mamy narzędzi moralnych, aby ich osądzać lub inspirować do zmiany zachowania. Jedynym na to lekarstwem jest samoświadomość, którą się często rozwija latami. Ale tutaj nasza tradycja może nam bardzo pomóc: nieustannie czyni nas ona bardziej ludźmi społecznymi, bardziej wrażliwymi na potrzeby innych i zawiera w sobie bardzo wiele mądrości odnośnie wszystkich tych kwestii.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Thoughts on Pesach 5782

Leave Behind

Thoughts on Pesach 5782

Menachem Mirski

This Friday at sunset we will mark the beginning not only of Shabbat, but also the festival of Pesach, which is one of the main pillars of our religious experience and our identity. Passover is a festival of freedom and joy, but also of certain duties and necessary sacrifices which are supposed to shape us psychologically so that we become conscious “owners of freedom”:

The Egyptians urged the people on, impatient to have them leave the country, for they said, “We shall all be dead.” So the people took their dough before it was leavened, their kneading bowls wrapped in their cloaks upon their shoulders… Moreover, a mixed multitude went up with them, and very much livestock, both flocks and herds. And they baked unleavened cakes of the dough that they had taken out of Egypt, for it was not leavened, since they had been driven out of Egypt and could not delay; nor had they prepared any provisions for themselves. (Ex 12:33-34;38-39)

The above story is the source of a law according to which during Pesach we don’t eat not only leavened bread, but also any kind of products containing chametz, i.e. made based on the leaven of five grains: rye, wheat, spelt, oat and barley, or containing even trace amounts of them, if the process of their production could have led to the creation of leaven. Not only eating, but also owning these products on Pesach is forbidden.

Sometimes it is generally said that we do all this to commemorate those events; but this statement is not correct, since this tradition is based on a “stronger” rabbinical rule expressed in the Mishna (Pesachim 10:5): “In each and every generation a person must view himself as though he personally left Egypt, as it is stated: ‘And you shall tell your son on that day, saying: It is because of this which the Lord did for me when I came forth out of Egypt’ (Exodus 13:8)”. This rabbinical rule is almost ordering us to “embody” the fact of leaving Egypt, so that we never go back there again and so that once and for all we can remain free people, which in the human world has always been and still remains a challenge, often an uneasy challenge.

That’s among others the reason why our tradition abounds in rituals and laws helping us “embody” the experience of the exodus from Egypt. Some of them are laws regarding chametz:

When one searches for chametz on the night of the fourteenth or the day of the fourteenth [of the month of Nissan] or in the middle of the festival, he should recite the blessing before he begins to search: Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, who has sanctified us with His commandments and has commanded us about destruction of chametz. And he searches and seeks [it] in all of the places into which we introduce chametz, as we have explained. (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Leavened and Unleavened Bread 3:6)

And he searches and seeks [it] in all of the places into which we introduce chametz…– such a search can be very time consuming or actually never ending, if someone treats this matter very meticulously. So we don’t become obsessed over this, the Rabbis decided that there must be a rule limiting the practice of searching and getting rid of the chametz:

And when he finishes searching – if he searched on the night of the fourteenth or on the day of the fourteenth [Nissan] before the sixth hour, he must nullify all of the chametz that remained in his possession and that he does not see. And he should say, “All the chametz that is in my possession that I have not seen – behold it is like dust.” (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Leavened and Unleavened Bread 3:7)

Therefore we are obliged to end the search for the chametz at a certain point and recognize that we’ve done everything in our power and seal this with the above mentioned statement. In my opinion what’s very important here is that we should use such “limiting rules” not only with regards to chametz, but also many other areas of our lives. Let us then engage in an intellectual experiment and let’s consider that chametz is: a burden, a problem, a hardship, a yoke or – a weakness or addiction. All such things are obstacles limiting our freedom. We should be always eliminating them from our lives. In many cases we should be as meticulous as with the searching for and destruction of chametz, otherwise the problems and burdens will quickly come back to us. But here we also need a “limiting rule”, so that we don’t become obsessed with fighting against all these things, since this can yield contrary to expected effects. For example focusing obsessively on one’s own weaknesses or an exaggerated search for evil in everything that surrounds us, even if the motivation behind it is positive, doesn’t make our life better. At a certain point while fighting against such things we must simply recognize that we’ve done a lot, that we’ve done all that was in our power, seal it with a blessing, leave those burdens and weaknesses behind us and keep on living our lives, not letting ourselves be determined by something we have already largely overcome, yet not completely.

Shabbat shalom,

Chag Pesach Sameach!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Translated from Polish by: Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Refleksja na Pesach 5782

Zostawić za sobą

Refleksja na Pesach 5782

Menachem Mirski

W najbliższy piątek, o zachodzie słońca, rozpoczyna się nie tylko szabat, ale także i święto Pesach, będące jednym z głównych filarów naszego religijnego doświadczenia i naszej tożsamości. Święto Pesach jest świętem wolności i radości, ale i pewnych obowiązków oraz koniecznych wyrzeczeń, mających nas psychologicznie uformować tak, żebyśmy byli świadomymi “posiadaczami wolności”:

I nalegali Micrejczycy na lud, by ich czemprędzej wyprawić z kraju, bo rzekli: “Wszyscy pomrzemy”. I poniósł lud ciasto swoje, zanim się zakwasiło, donice swoje obwinięte w zwierzchnie szaty swe, na barkach swoich. […] I także różnoplemiennego ludu mnóstwo wyszło z nimi i trzody, i stada, dobytek wielki bardzo. I wypiekli ciasto, które wynieśli z Micraim, na placki przaśne; ponieważ się nie zakwasiło, bo wypędzeni zostali z Micraim, a nie mogli się zatrzymywać; a także zapasów nie przygotowali sobie. (Wj 12:33-34;38-39)

Powyższa historia jest źródłem prawa, wedle którego nie jemy w Pesach nie tylko chleba kwaszonego, ale także wszelkich produktów zawierający chamec, tzn. sporządzonych na zakwasie z pięciu zbóż: żyta, pszenicy, orkiszu, owsa i jęczmienia, jaki też zawierające choćby śladowe ich ilości, jeśli proces ich produkcji mógł doprowadzić do powstania zakwasu. Nie tylko jedzenie, ale i posiadanie tych produktów jest w Pesach zakazane.

Potocznie mawia się czasem, że robimy to wszystko na pamiątkę owych wydarzeń; stwierdzenie to jednak nie jest adekwatne, bowiem owa tradycja opiera się na “mocniejszej” rabinicznej zasadzie, wyrażonej w Misznie (Pesachim 10:5): W każdym pokoleniu człowiek winien postrzegać siebie tak, jakby osobiście opuścił Egipt, jest bowiem napisane: I opowiesz synowi twojemu dnia onego, mówiąc: to dla tego, co uczynił mi Wiekuisty, gdym wychodził z Micraim. Owa rabiniczna zasada nakazuje nam niemalże “ucieleśnić” fakt wyjścia z Egiptu, po to, ażeby nigdy do niego już nie wracać i aby raz na zawsze pozostać ludźmi wolnymi, co w świecie ludzkim zawsze było i jest wciąż wyzwaniem, często niełatwym wyzwaniem.

Między innymi z tego właśnie powodu nasza tradycja obfituje w rytuały i prawa pomagające nam “ucieleśnić” doświadczenie wyjścia z Egiptu. Jednymi spośród nich są prawa dotyczące chamecu:

Szukając chamecu w nocy lub w ciągu dnia czternastego [miesiąca Nissan], lub w czasie święta, należy odmówić błogosławieństwo, zanim zacznie się szukać: Błogosławiony jesteś, Boże nasz, Królu Wszechświata, który uświęciłeś nas swoimi przykazaniami i nakazałeś nam zniszczenie chamecu. Szukamy [go] we wszystkich miejscach, do których mogliśmy go zanieść, jak wyjaśniliśmy powyżej. (Majmonides, Miszne Tora, Kwaszony i niekwaszony chleb 3:6)

Szukamy [go] we wszystkich miejscach, do których mogliśmy go zanieść… – takie poszukiwania mogą być bardzo czasochłonne lub wręcz nie mieć końca, jeśli ktoś traktuje sprawę bardzo skrupulatnie. Byśmy więc nie popadli w obsesję w tej kwestii, rabini uznali, że potrzebna jest reguła ograniczająca praktykę poszukiwania i pozbywania się chamecu:

A kiedy skończymy poszukiwania – jeśli szukaliśmy w nocy czternastego lub w ciągu dnia, czternastego [Nissan] przed godziną szóstą, musimy unicestwić cały chamec, który pozostał w naszym posiadaniu i ten, którego nie widzimy. I powinniśmy powiedzieć: „Cały chamec, który jest w moim posiadaniu, a którego nie widziałem, jest jak proch”. (Majmonides, Miszne Tora, Kwaszony i niekwaszony chleb 3:7)

Jesteśmy zatem zobligowani zakończyć poszukiwania chamecu w pewnym momencie i uznać, że zrobiliśmy wszystko, co było w naszej mocy i przypieczętować to powyższą deklaracją. Co jest moim zdaniem bardzo tutaj istotne to to, że tego rodzaju “zasady ograniczające” powinniśmy stosować nie tylko wobec chamecu, ale i w wielu innych dziedzinach naszego życia. Zróbmy więc intelektualny eksperyment i uznajmy chamec za: ciężar, kłopot, uciążliwość, brzemię, albo – słabość czy uzależnienie. Wszystkie tego rodzaju zjawiska stanowią przeszkody ograniczające naszą wolność. Powinniśmy je stale z naszego życia eliminować. W wielu przypadkach powinniśmy być tak skrupulatni, jak z szukaniem i unicestwianiem chamecu, inaczej kłopoty i uciążliwości szybko do nas wrócą. Jednakże i tu potrzebujemy “zasady ograniczającej” żeby nie popaść w obsesję w walce z tymi wszystkimi zjawiskami, bowiem to może przynieść efekty przeciwne do zamierzonych. Obsesyjne skupianie się na własnych słabościach, na przykład, lub też przesadne doszukiwanie się zła we wszystkim wokół, choćby pozytywnie motywowane, nie czyni naszego życia lepszym. W pewnym momencie walki z tymi zjawiskami musimy po prostu uznać, że zrobiliśmy dużo, że zrobiliśmy wszystko, co było w naszej mocy, przypieczętować to błogosławieństwem, zostawić owe ciężary i słabości za sobą, i iść przez życie dalej, nie dając się determinować czemuś, co w dużym stopniu już przezwyciężyliśmy, choć jeszcze nie całkowicie.

Szabat szalom,

Chag Pesach sameach!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Shemini

Things we deserved and things we didn’t deserve

Thoughts on parashat Shemini

Menachem Mirski 

Does everything (bad) that happens to us happen for a reason? If so, where should we look for answers? In theology, science or our moral conduct as individuals or groups? The Torah portion for this week brings up this topic. On the eighth day, following the seven days of their inauguration, Aaron and his sons begin to officiate as kohanim (priests); a fire comes down from God to consume the offerings on the altar, and the divine presence comes to dwell in the Sanctuary. Aaron’s two elder sons, Nadav and Avihu, offer a “foreign fire before God” and die before God. Aaron is silent in face of this tragedy. Moses and Aaron subsequently disagree as to a point of law regarding the offerings, but Moses concedes to Aaron that Aaron is in the right.

The reason that Nadav and Avihu died is mentioned in theTorah:

And the sons of Aharon took each his censer, and they put in them incense. And they offered before יהוה foreign fire which He had not commanded them.

(Leviticus 10:1)

Yet the Sages and the midrashim give numerous reasons and explanations as to what their sin was and why they died. Some commentators praise Aharon’s sons and consider them as exceptional people: the sons meant what they did for the best and did more than they were commanded. But they were punished because no man has the right to do more or less in the Divine service than he was commanded. Other commentators find serious faults in the actions of Aharon’s sons. Some claim that they showed disrespect for the Mishkan and the Divine service, for example, that they entered the Mishkan wearing the robes of a regular Kohen rather than those of a Kohen Gadol; they had previously imbibed wine; they offered a sacrifice which they had not been commanded to bring. There are also commentators who accuse them of improper behavior which discredited their priesthood: that they were arrogant and did not take wives because of their conceit, for they felt that no other family was as distinguished as theirs, and they did not have children; that they were not friendly to one another; they wanted to determine the halachah in the presence of their Rebbi (Moshe), or, they awaited the death of Moshe and Aharon, so that they could take over the leadership of the nation.

The list of reasons for their sudden death goes on and on. Thus, it is legitimate to ask why the Rabbis were not satisfied with the simple answer given by the Torah and had to bring all of the other reasons. The answer to that question lies in the two fundamental theological assumptions of rabbinic thinking with regard to theodicy: 1) Everything bad that happens to the (Jewish) people can be and generally should be seen as Divine punishment; 2) The rabbinic mind has always been sensitive to injustice, and consequently, to any sort of incommensurability of the Divine punishment. The first assumption actually belongs to the oldest strata of biblical theology and theodicy: God is always just and every suffering/injustice comes from human sin/error. It’s not the only theodicy in Judaism; other answers to the problem of evil, including various concepts of unjustified suffering, had been successively developed starting from the late Second Temple period. But the idea that every misfortune and suffering is a result of human and not Divine action marks the rabbinic mind definitely until Holocaust and to some extent even until today. Thus, regarding the second assumption, the Rabbis, seeing the disproportion of the punishment, had no other choice than to come up with a variety of reasons for it.

Whether it is right to see everything that happens to us through the lens of Divine reward/punishment is a very extensive topic. To see everything that way is more “faith oriented”, so to say, whereas to admit that there is undeserved pain and suffering seems to be more “reason oriented”. Both approaches have their pros and cons. To see everything through the lens of Divine punishment can be for us, and often is, a driving force to be more moral, more careful, more observant, namely, to be conscious of our own responsibilities. To admit that there is an undeserved pain and suffering opens our eyes and minds to everything we have no influence on and it often helps us deal with our feelings of guilt.

All that is particularly relevant in our political judgments today. There are always things we, as individuals, communities or nations could have done better. But there are also the things we had no influence on, even though we could sense long before that they would determine our fate in a way we would want to avoid. Let’s apply this to the current situation of Ukraine and the Ukrainian people: this country has a long record of corrupt governments and social injustices stemming from it. Had they done better in this matter, as a nation and society, their position right now would have probably been better. Even their president, Zelensky, with my entire sympathy and admiration towards him, committed several mistakes, like those in his speech in Knesset a few days ago: his comparisons of the present situation of Ukraine to the Holocaust, as well as his claims about the role of Ukrainians in saving Jews during that time, were very inaccurate. But none of what the Ukrainians and their leadership did or didn’t do in recent decades makes them deserve Putin’s Russia aggression. What the Ukrainian people absolutely deserve is greater support from the West, in every politically doable matter. But on the other hand, this fact should not make us blind to the difficult and painful events that took place in the course of Polish-Jewish-Ukrainian history. It’s not necessary to talk about these events right now but it’s also unnecessary to idealize the victims in order to help them to bring peace and justice.

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Szemini

Rzeczy, na które zasłużyliśmy i te, na które nie zasłużyliśmy

Refleksja nad paraszą Szemini

Menachem Mirski 

Czy wszystko (złe), co nam się przytrafia, wydarza się z jakiegoś powodu? Jeśli tak, to gdzie szukać odpowiedzi? W teologii, nauce czy w naszym postępowaniu moralnym jako jednostek lub grup? Porcja Tory na ten tydzień porusza ten temat: ósmego dnia, po siedmiu dniach ich inauguracji, Aharon i jego synowie zaczynają sprawować urząd jako kohanim (kapłani); ogień zstępuje od Boga, aby strawić ofiary na ołtarzu, i tym samy przybywa boska obecność, aby zamieszkać w Sanktuarium. Dwaj starsi synowie Aharona, Nadab i Abihu, ofiarowują „obcy ogień przed Bogiem” i umierają. Aaron milczy w obliczu tej tragedii. Mosze i Aharon później nie zgadzają się co do kwestii halachicznej dotyczącej ofiar, ale ostatecznie Mojżesz przyznaje Aaronowi rację.

Powód śmierci Nadaba i Abihu jest podany w Torze:

I wzięli synowie Ahrona – Nadab i Abihu, każdy kadzielnicę swoję, i włożyli w nie ognia, i położyli nań kadzidła, i tak przynieśli przed oblicze Wiekuistego ogień obcy, którego nie przykazał im (Kapłańska 10:1).

Jednakże nasi mędrcy i ich midrasze podają liczne powody i wyjaśnienia, jaki był ich grzech i dlaczego umarli. Niektórzy komentatorzy chwalą synów Aharona i uważają ich za wyjątkowych ludzi: synowie wiedzieli, co robili, ich intencje były dobre, lecz zrobili więcej, niż im nakazano i zostali ukarani, ponieważ żaden człowiek nie ma prawa wykonywać w służbie Bożej więcej lub mniej, niż mu nakazano. Inni komentatorzy dopatrują się natomiast poważnych błędów w poczynaniach synów Aharona. Niektórzy twierdzą, że okazywali brak szacunku dla Miszkanu i służby Bożej, na przykład, że weszli do Miszkanu w szatach zwykłego Kohena, a nie Kohena Gadol; inne wyjaśnienie – wcześniej pili wino; złożyli ofiarę, której nie nakazano im złożyć. Są też komentatorzy, którzy zarzucają im niewłaściwe zachowanie, kompromitujące ich kapłaństwo: że byli aroganccy i nie żenili się z powodu swojej zarozumiałości, gdyż uważali, że żadna inna rodzina nie była tak wyróżniająca się jak ich, w rezultacie – że nie mieli dzieci; że nie byli dla siebie przyjaźni; że chcieli ustalić halachę w obecności ich Rebbi (Mosze) lub wręcz czekali na śmierć Moszego i Aharona, aby mogli przejąć przywództwo narodu.

Lista przyczyn ich nagłej śmierci jest długa. Dlatego uzasadnione jest pytanie, dlaczego rabini nie byli zadowoleni z prostej odpowiedzi udzielonej przez Torę i musieli podać te wszystkie inne powody. Odpowiedź na to pytanie tkwi w dwóch fundamentalnych założeniach teologicznych myśli rabinicznej w odniesieniu do teodycei: 1) Wszystko, co złe, co dzieje się z narodem (żydowskim) może być i powinno być postrzegane jako kara Boża; 2) Umysł rabiniczny zawsze był wrażliwy na niesprawiedliwość, a co za tym idzie, na jakąkolwiek niewspółmierność kary Bożej. Pierwsze założenie należy właściwie do najstarszych warstw teologii i teodycei biblijnej: Bóg jest zawsze sprawiedliwy, a każde cierpienie/niesprawiedliwość pochodzi z ludzkiego grzechu/błędu. To nie jedyna teodycea w judaizmie; inne odpowiedzi na problem zła, w tym różne koncepcje nieusprawiedliwionego cierpienia, były sukcesywnie rozwijane, począwszy od późnego okresu Drugiej Świątyni. Ale idea, że ​​każde nieszczęście i cierpienie jest wynikiem działania ludzkiego, a nie Boskiego, naznacza umysł rabina zdecydowanie aż do Holokaustu, a do pewnego stopnia nawet do dzisiaj. W związku z tym drugim założeniem rabini, widząc dysproporcję kary, nie mieli innego wyjścia, jak starać się odnaleźć różne jej inne przyczyny.

To, czy słuszne jest postrzeganie wszystkiego, co nam się przydarza, przez pryzmat Boskiej nagrody/kary, to bardzo obszerny temat. Widzenie wszystkiego w taki właśnie sposób nazwałbym „zorientowaniem na wiarę”, podczas gdy przyznanie, że istnieje w świecie niezasłużony ból i cierpienie, wydaje się być czymś bardziej „zorientowany na rozum czy rozsądek”. Oba podejścia mają swoje plusy i minusy. Spojrzenie na wszystko przez pryzmat kary Bożej może być dla nas i często jest siłą napędową, aby być bardziej moralnym, bardziej uważnym, bardziej spostrzegawczym, i np. bardziej świadomym swoich własnych obowiązków. Przyznanie się, że istnieje niezasłużony ból i cierpienie, otwiera także nasze oczy i umysły na wszystko, na co nie mamy wpływu i często pomaga nam radzić sobie z poczuciem winy.

Wszystko to jest szczególnie istotne w naszych dzisiejszych osądach politycznych. Zawsze są rzeczy, które my jako jednostki, społeczności lub narody mogliśmy zrobić lepiej. Ale są też rzeczy, na które nie mieliśmy wpływu, choć już dawno wyczuwaliśmy, że zadecydują o naszym losie w sposób, którego chcielibyśmy uniknąć. Zastosujmy to do obecnej sytuacji Ukrainy i narodu ukraińskiego: kraj ten ma długą historię skorumpowanych rządów i wynikających z tego niesprawiedliwości społecznych. Gdyby radzili sobie lepiej w tej sprawie, jako naród i społeczeństwo, ich pozycja w tej chwili byłaby prawdopodobnie lepsza. Nawet ich prezydent Zełenski, z całą moją sympatią i podziwem dla niego, popełnił kilka błędów, jak te w swoim przemówieniu w Knesecie kilka dni temu: porównanie obecnej sytuacji Ukrainy do Holokaustu, a także twierdzenia o roli Ukraińców w ratowaniu Żydów w czasie Zagłady była bardzo nieadekwatne. Jednakże nic z tego, co Ukraińcy i ich przywódcy zrobili lub czego nie zrobili w ostatnich dziesięcioleciach, nie sprawia, że ​​zasługują na agresję Putina na Rosję. To, na co naród ukraiński absolutnie zasługuje, to większe wsparcie Zachodu w każdej politycznie możliwej sprawie. Z drugiej jednak strony fakt ten nie powinien przesłaniać nam trudnych i bolesnych wydarzeń, które miały miejsce w polsko-żydowsko-ukraińskiej historii. Nie trzeba koniecznie rozmawiać o tych wydarzeniach właśnie teraz, ale i też nie jest konieczne idealizowanie ofiar po to, aby pomóc im przywrócić pokój i sprawiedliwość na świecie.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Vayakhel

Defending our values requires sacrifices

Thoughts on parashat Vayakhel

 Menachem Mirski 

Our Torah portion for this week is among those that deal with the building of the Mishkan / Tabernacle. At the very beginning of our parasha Moses speaks to the Israelites about the necessary contributions they need to make in order to build the House in which God Himself resides.

Moses said further to the whole community of Israelites:This is what יהוה has commanded: Take from among you gifts to יהוה; everyone whose heart is so moved shall bring them—gifts for יהוה: gold, silver, and copper; blue, purple, and crimson yarns, fine linen, and goats’ hair; tanned ram skins, dolphin skins, and acacia wood; oil for lighting, spices for the anointing oil and for the aromatic incense; lapis lazuli and other stones for setting, for the ephod and the breastpiece. And let all among you who are skilled come and make all that יהוה has commanded: the Tabernacle, its tent and its covering, its clasps and its planks, its bars, its posts, and its sockets […] And everyone who excelled in ability and everyone whose spirit was moved came, bringing to יהוה an offering for the work of the Tent of Meeting and for all its service and for the sacral vestments. Men and women, all whose hearts moved them, all who would make an elevation offering of gold to יהוה, came bringing brooches, earrings, rings, and pendants — gold objects of all kinds. (Ex 35:4-11;21-22)

The Israelites brought these precious materials and did this work in the name of faith in fundamental, holy principles, as well as to build their national and religious identity and unity. Today all of this is in a deep crisis, especially in the Western World. We, people of the West, are narcissistic when it comes to our lifestyle and self-obsessed in terms of what we believe our role on Earth is. One of our fundamental mistakes is that we think that the entire world thinks like us and wants what we want, namely, economic prosperity and good life for every citizen. The thing is that this is not the case of countries ruled by dictators and oligarchs, like Russia, China or Iran.

In April 2019 the Levada Center pollster published a poll according to which 70 % of Russians believe that Stalin played a positive role in the history of Russia (only 19 percent viewed Stalin’s role negatively, down from 32 percent in 2016.) The prevalence of such a view in Russian society was almost unthinkable in the 90’s or even in the early 2000’s. Nostalgia for the „old greatness” of the Soviet Empire has significantly grown in the recent two decades and it doesn’t matter that the entire Russian economy has a GPD almost the same as the state of Florida. It doesn’t matter because the leadership of countries like Russia, China or Iran doesn’t care about the prosperity and good life of their citizens – it is actually at the very bottom of the list of their priorities. Their top priority is the “mythical greatness” of their countries, to which, unfortunately, a significant part of their society gives the green light (not forgetting, of course, about those who strongly protest against such mythomania). Thus I suppose that the economic sanctions will have a little, if at all, impact on Russia and her “imperial ambitions”.

Another problem that we have in our Western societies is that currently we can’t even unify what our chief social philosophy is or what our values are. We can’t even unify that our history has a deeper meaning and is worth reverence, or at least – respect. What is pervasive instead is self loathing, pointing fingers at each other and virtue signaling – pointing out who is smarter, more just and more moral, and it is usually “us” who are all those things. It all means nothing if there are no unified standards in this matter and if there are no commonly shared values, it becomes yet another driving force for social tribalism and political divisions. Without unifying standards more and more people involved in politics don’t care about values they used to stand for: all they care about is power, and that is the way they become more and more like Russian or Chinese oligarchs. Falsehoods like “everything is about power” openly spread in the Western intellectual and political discourse not only question all the values we believed in, all our morality and even ordinary decency. Platitudes like that are not only wrong; they are harmful because they relativize everything, open a path to Machiavellism and invite bad actors, like Putin, to the game.

But that’s enough bitterness, especially that our life is disgustingly comfortable compared to what the Ukrainian people experience at this moment, seeking shelter in the Kiev metro or deciding to find a refuge in Poland (like those who found shelter at the train station in my hometown, Przemyśl.) Times and moments like this should make us realize what are the real values on which our Western, free societies are founded; that there are things in life that are more important than comfort and everyday pleasures; that it is the fundamental values such as truth, justice and liberty that make our joyful and comfortable lives possible. The societies that don’t cherish these values drift fast towards the reality of Egypt, where tyrants or a small groups of oligarchs benefit enormously from work of impoverished masses that work from dawn to dusk without the day of rest, or, in an alternative scenario these masses have no work at all and no purpose of life other than survival, or no purpose at all, and nobody cares about it. That’s the reality that is looming everytime our true values are questioned. Maimonides believed that the essence of the first commandment is an unshakable faith in the Eternal and the minute we question His divinity, we question all our values, all our ethics, law and societal order. Absolutism can be a source of injustice, as history has shown numerous times, but there are times and places where being absolutely tied to our fundamental values is necessary and for the benefit of all of us. This, however, often requires sacrifices and that’s exactly the message Moses brought to our forefathers.

Shabbat shalom,

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Wajakhel

Obrona naszych wartości wymaga ofiar

Refleksja nad paraszą Wajakhel

Menachem Mirski

Porcja Tory na ten tydzień jest jedną z tych, które omawiają budowę Miszkanu / Przybytku. Na samym początku naszej paraszy Mojżesz informuje Izraelitów o konieczności datków i innego rodzaju wkładu, jaki muszą oni wnieść, aby zbudować Dom, w którym zamieszkuje sam Bóg.

Tak przemówił następnie Mojżesz do całego zgromadzenia Izraelitów: «Oto co nakazał Wiekuisty mówiąc: „Dajcie z dóbr waszych daninę dla Wiekuistego”. Każdy więc, którego skłoni do tego serce, winien złożyć jako daninę dla Wiekuistego złoto, srebro, brąz, purpurę fioletową i czerwoną, karmazyn, bisior oraz sierść kozią, baranie skóry barwione na czerwono i skóry delfinów oraz drzewo akacjowe, oliwę do świecznika, wonności do wyrobu oleju namaszczania i pachnących kadzideł, kamienie onyksowe i inne drogie kamienie dla ozdobienia efodu i pektorału. Każdy uzdolniony z was winien przyjść i wykonać to, co Wiekuisty nakazał, to jest przybytek i jego namiot, przykrycia, kółka, deski, poprzeczki, słupy i podstawy […] Potem całe zgromadzenie Izraelitów odeszło od Mojżesza. Wnet jednak wszyscy, których skłoniło serce i duch ochoczy, przynieśli daninę dla Wiekuistego na budowę Namiotów Spotkania i na wszelką służbę w nim, oraz na święte szaty. Przyszli mężczyźni i kobiety, wszyscy ochoczego serca, przynosząc spinki, kolczyki, pierścienie, naszyjniki i wszelkie przedmioty ze złota; wszyscy złożyli Wiekuistemu dary ze złota dokonując gestu kołysania. (Ex 35:4-11;20-22)

Izraelici przynieśli te cenne materiały i wykonali te prace w imię wiary w fundamentalne, święte zasady, a także w celu budowania swojej narodowej i religijnej tożsamości oraz jedności. Dziś wszystko to znajduje się w głębokim kryzysie, zwłaszcza w świecie zachodnim. My, ludzie Zachodu, jesteśmy narcyzami, jeśli chodzi o nasz styl życia i mamy obsesję na punkcie tego, jaka jest nasza rola pośród innych ludów na Ziemi. Jednym z naszych podstawowych błędów jest przekonanie, że cały świat myśli tak jak my i chce tego, czego my chcemy, czyli gospodarczego dobrobytu i dobrego życia dla każdego obywatela. Rzecz w tym, że w krajach rządzonych przez dyktatorów i oligarchów, jak Rosja, Chiny czy Iran, sprawy się mają inaczej.

W kwietniu 2019 r. niezależne, rosyjskie centrum badań opinii publicznej Levada  opublikowało sondaż, według którego 70 proc. Rosjan uważało, że ​​Stalin odegrał pozytywną rolę w historii Rosji (tylko 19 proc. negatywnie oceniło rolę Stalina, w porównaniu z 32 proc. w 2016 r). Tak wielka popularność poglądu tego rodzaju w rosyjskim społeczeństwie byłaby nie do pomyślenia w latach 90, czy na początku pierwszej dekady XXI wieku. Nostalgia za „dawną wielkością” imperium sowieckiego znacznie wzrosła w ciągu ostatnich dwóch dekad i nie ma tu znaczenia, że ​​PKB całej rosyjskiej gospodarki jest porównywalny np. z jednym stanem Ameryki – z Florydą. Nie ma to znaczenia, ponieważ przywódcy krajów takich jak Rosja, Chiny czy Iran nie dbają tak naprawdę o gospodarkę i dobrobyt swoich obywateli: znajdują się one na samym dole listy ich priorytetów. Ich naczelnym priorytetem jest natomiast „mityczna wielkość” ich krajów, czemu niestety znaczna część tych społeczeństw daje zielone światło (nie zapominając oczywiście o tych, którzy zdecydowanie protestują przeciwko takiej mitomanii). Z tego powodu przypuszczam, że sankcje gospodarcze będą miały niewielki, jeśli w ogóle, wpływ na Rosję i jej „imperialne ambicje”.

Innym problemem, który mamy w naszych zachodnich społeczeństwach, jest to, że nie  potrafimy nawet dojść do porozumienia w kwestii jaka jest nasza główna filozofia społeczna lub jakie są nasze (wspólne) wartości. Nie możemy się też dogadać w kwestii tego, że nasza historia ma głębszy sens i jest warta czci, lub przynajmniej szacunku. Tym, co jest natomiast coraz bardziej powszechne jest wstręt do samych siebie, wytykanie siebie nawzajem palcami i “sygnalizowanie cnoty” – wskazywanie, kto jest mądrzejszy, bardziej sprawiedliwy i bardziej moralny, i nie trzeba już dodawać to zawsze „my” nimi jesteśmy. Wszystko to nic nie znaczy, jeśli nie ma w tej kwestii jednolitych standardów i wspólnych wartości, staje się to kolejną siłą napędową plemienności społecznej i politycznych podziałów. Bez ujednolicenia standardów coraz więcej ludzi zaangażowanych w politykę nie dba o wartości, za którymi kiedyś opowiadali się: zależy im tylko na władzy i w ten sposób coraz bardziej upodabniają się do rosyjskich czy chińskich oligarchów. Kłamliwe frazesy, takie jak „we wszystkim chodzi wyłącznie o władzę” (ang. everything is about power), otwarcie rozpowszechniane w zachodnim dyskursie intelektualnym i politycznym, nie tylko kwestionują wszystkie wartości, w które niegdyś wierzyliśmy, całą naszą moralność, czy nawet zwykłą przyzwoitość. Takie frazesy są nie tylko błędne; są szkodliwe, bo wszystko relatywizują, otwierają drogę do makiawelizmu i zapraszają do gry złych graczy, takich jak Putin.

Ale dość już tej goryczy, zwłaszcza że nasze życie jest “obrzydliwie wygodne” w porównaniu z tym, co przeżywają w tej chwili Ukraińcy, szukając schronienia w kijowskim metrze lub decydując się na życie uchodźcy w Polsce (jak np. ci, którzy znaleźli schronienie na dworcu w moim rodzinnym mieście, Przemyślu.). Czasy i chwile jak te powinny nam uświadamiać czym są owe prawdziwe wartości na których są nasze zachodnie, wolne społeczeństwa ufundowane i że są w życiu rzeczy ważniejsze niż wygoda i codzienne przyjemności; że te podstawowe wartości, takie jak prawda, sprawiedliwość i wolność, właśnie umożliwiają nam owo radosne i wygodne życie. Społeczeństwa, które nie hołubią tych wartości, szybko dryfują w kierunku rzeczywistości znanej nam z biblijnego Egiptu, w której tyrani lub małe grupy oligarchów żyją z pracy zubożałych mas, pracujących od świtu do zmierzchu bez dnia odpoczynku, lub, w innym scenariuszu, masy te w ogóle nie mają pracy oraz innego celu  życia niż przetrwanie, i nikt się tym nie przejmuje. Tego rodzaju rzeczywistość wyziera za każdym razem, gdy kwestionowane są nasze prawdziwe wartości. Majmonides wierzył, że istotą pierwszego przykazania dekalogu jest niezachwiana wiara w Wiekuistego, a w chwili, gdy kwestionujemy Jego boskość, kwestionujemy wszystkie nasze wartości, całą naszą etykę, prawo i porządek społeczny. Absolutyzm, jak wiemy z historii, bywał źródłem wielkich niesprawiedliwości, jednakże są chwile i miejsca, w których bezwzględne przywiązanie do naszych fundamentalnych wartości jest konieczne, dla dobra nas wszystkich. To jednak często wymaga wyrzeczeń oraz poświęceń, i to jest właśnie przesłanie, które Mojżesz przyniósł naszym praojcom.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Tecawe

Bezpośrednia komunikacja z Wiekuistym

Refleksja nad paraszą Tecawe

Menachem Mirski

Czynienie rzeczy właściwych różni się od wzywania do lub usprawiedliwiania robienia właściwych rzeczy. Praktycznie rzecz biorąc, te dwie rzeczy nie zawsze idą w parze. Usprawiedliwione dobro nie jest bardziej dobre niż samo dobro, chociaż usprawiedliwienia mogą utrwalać więcej dobra. Podobnie, robienie czegoś złego różni się od próby wybielania lub usprawiedliwiania zła. Usprawiedliwione zło może się jednak stać o wiele bardziej złe niż to, co po prostu złe. W ludzkim świecie rzeczy na ogół dążą się ku złu jeśli są po prostu pozostawione same sobie i nikt o nic nie dba. Może mieć coś wspólnego ze strukturą wszechświata, prawami termodynamiki i entropii. Czasami w naszym życiu stajemy przed trudnymi decyzjami, w których mamy do czynienia ze sprzecznymi rozwiązaniami, które mogą mieć długotrwałe konsekwencje, ponieważ sprawy są bardzo spolaryzowane.

Gdy sprawy stoją na przysłowiowej krawędzi, gdzie jedna decyzja w jednym kierunku może zaowocować rozmaitymi profitami i błogosławieństwem, w drugim zaś kierunku może okazać się katastrofalna w skutkach. W takich trudnych chwilach ludzie w historii często powierzali swój los jakimś wyższym, niż ludzkie, instancjom, a przynajmniej wierzyli, że właśnie tak robią. W naszej porcji Tory na ten tydzień znajdujemy opis jednego z instrumentów, który służył bezpośredniej konsultacji z Najwyższym, właśnie w celu dokonania odpowiedniej decyzji:

Do pektorału dla zasięgania wyroczni włożysz urim i tummim, aby były na sercu Aarona, gdy będzie wchodził przed oblicze Pana. I tak będzie nosił Aaron zawsze na sercu swoim [pektorał] do zasięgania wyroczni dla Izraelitów przed obliczem Wiekuistego. (Wj 28:30)

Czym były Urim i Tummim? Były to bardzo tajemnicze elementy, często przedstawiane jako kamienie, które sprawiały, że napierśnik Arcykapłana “działał”. Napierśnik wykonany był z 12 drogocennych kamieni, na których wyryto imiona 12 plemion izraelskich. Komentarze Nachmanidesa podają za Talmudem (Joma 77), że na napierśniku znalazły się również imiona Patriarchów wraz ze słowami Sziwtei Jeshurun ​​– Plemiona Jeszuruna (Izraela). W ten sposób na napierśniku znalazły się wszystkie 22 litery alfabetu hebrajskiego. Urim i Tummim umieszczono wewnątrz napierśnika i przez nie właśnie Wiekuisty podświetlał niektóre litery imion na napierśniku, a Najwyższy Kapłan (Kohen Gadol) porządkował te litery w słowa. Na przykład, gdy Izraelici zapytali: „Kto powinien wystąpić z nami przeciwko Kananejczykom?” (Królewska 1:1), litery słowa „Jehuda” zaświeciły się wraz z literą jud Lewiego, ajin Szimona, lamed Lewiego i he Avahama, przeliterujących słowo ja’ale – „Jehuda wystąpi” (dosłownie “wzniesie się”, “wyjdzie na górę.”

Cały kapłański napierśnik nosi nazwę Choszen Miszpat, co po hebrajsku oznacza „napierśnik sądu” (Wj 28:15). Oryginalny napierśnik z Urim i Tummim zaginął wraz ze zniszczeniem Pierwszej Świątyni i od tego czasu nie został odnaleziony.

Ciekawą, symboliczną interpretację tego, czym był Choszen Miszpat i jego funkcji, można znaleźć w komentarzu Kli Yakara (rabina Shlomo Ephraima ben Aarona Luntschitza, 1550-1619, mieszkającego w Pradze). Kli Yakar cytuje innego komentatora, Akedę, który znajduje w postaci “napierśnika sądu” doszukuje się aluzji na do tego, jak winna działać żydowska sprawiedliwość. Każdy rząd miał trzy kamienie: jest to aluzja do batei din (sądów żydowskich) obsadzonych przez trzech sędziów. Niektóre kamienie były cenniejsze, inne mniej cenne – to uczy nas, że bogaci i biedni są równi w świetle prawa, a sprawy dotyczące małych kwot należy traktować równie poważnie, jak te dotyczące dużych kwot. Imiona synów Jaakowa zostały wyryte na kamieniach zgodnie z kolejnością ich urodzenia, aby nauczyć, że opinie zarówno starszych, jak i młodszych sędziów muszą być wysłuchane. Urim i Tummim zostały umieszczone w napierśniku, aby nauczać, że dajanim – „sędziowie w beit dinach” – niosą światło całemu światu. Sędziowie nazywani są „oczami społeczności”, ponieważ rzucają światło na kwestie, które wprawiają w zakłopotanie strony procesu.

Gdy ujmiemy to wszystko nieco bardziej ogólnie, poucza to nas, że sprawiedliwość jest zasadniczo przedsięwzięciem społecznym. W konsekwencji uczy to nas też o stronniczości naszego indywidualnego osądu człowieka. Uczy nas również, że szczytem sprawiedliwości jest obecny w niej Boski głos. Ten szczyt wyznacza jednocześnie ideał i najwyższą aspirację ludzkiego osądu. Dbajmy więc o ów ideał, bowiem bez niego nasz osąd będzie zawsze kulawy. Robienie czegoś dobrze, z długotrwałymi konsekwencjami, często wiąże się z różnymi przeszkodami, które “chcą” udaremnić nasze wysiłki. Tym, co sprawia, że nie ustajemy w naszych wysiłkach osiągnięcia dobra jest właśnie boskie światło, które jesteśmy w stanie objąć rozumem i to ono ostatecznie przezwycięża wszelką ciemność.

Szabat szalom,

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Mishpatim

 The perpetual cycle of seeing the bad only

Thoughts on parashat Mishpatim

 Menachem Mirski 

The country is difficult when everything seems to be the simplest to everyone
The country is beautiful when everything seems bad to everyone

Marek Grechuta, Jeszcze pożyjemy / Yet we will live

Parashat Mishpatim is extraordinarily rich in laws, judgements and statutes governing every facet of human existence. Many laws and norms found in our sidra are specifications of the laws contained in the Decalogue, which is in the previous Torah portion. This comprehensive legislation covers relations between man and man, man and society, man and his enemy and even between man and animal or plant. And while some of them may appear out of date at first glance, some of them are timeless and unquestionably relevant also in today’s world:

And you shall be holy men to me: neither shall you eat any meat that is torn of beasts in the field; you shall cast it to the dogs. Thou shalt not raise a false report: put not thy hand with the wicked to be an unrighteous witness. Thou shalt not follow a multitude to do evil; neither shalt thou speak in a cause to incline after a multitude to pervert justice: nor shalt thou favor a poor man in his cause. (Ex 22:30-23:1-3)

The first one, about not eating meat that is torn from an animal, is obvious to all of us. But I included it in the quotation above because for me they are logically a whole (and this whole is part of a larger whole). I believe that the essence of these words is the following: you shall be mindful and civilized, starting with what we eat and ending with our social behavior and political involvement. Not a lot of commentary is required to these words, that seem to be self-evident. But our parasha contains more wisdom regarding social life, and one of the most important of these is expressed in our parasha twice:

You shall not wrong a stranger or oppress him, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. (Ex 22:20)

Also thou shalt not oppress a stranger: for you know the heart of a stranger, seeing you were strangers in the land of Miżrayim. (Ex 23:9)

The idea to treat the stranger fairly / love him (because you were strangers in the land Egypt) is expressed in the Torah at least a dozen times. One might well ask why the Torah places so much emphasis on this. I believe that the answer is the following: The Torah is fully aware of the historical cycle of oppression happening between various nations and social groups, sees evil in it and therefore orders us not to act on the impulse of retaliation, in order to break this cycle.

This idea is extremely relevant today, especially because from Marx, throughout the twentieth century to the present day, it has become very popular to view history as an endless conflict between the oppressors and the oppressed. Some thinkers and academics see this concept even as a key to understanding the entire human history. Not questioning the fact that the processes of reciprocal, perpetual oppression take place in human history, I strongly disagree that it is THE KEY to understand history and society. Furthermore, I believe that viewing history only through this lens is very simplistic. Why? Because people fundamentally cooperate and viewing history exclusively through the lens of perpetual oppression makes us overlook this positive process of cooperation which is the fundament of our civilization, civilizational development and the source of everything good that humanity brought to the world!

I understand why some people so strongly insist on viewing history and social affairs through the oppressor/oppressed lens: being particularly focused on what is still bad in our society is often a sign of great concern for the good of society. This idea is captured in the song by the Polish singer and poet, Marek Grechuta, which I quoted at the beginning: The country is beautiful when everything seems bad to everyone. But the problem is that it cuts both ways. Being completely one-sided and overly negative in perceiving the world and human affairs does a great psychological harm to us and our communities. Talking all the time about various groups fighting and oppressing each other makes us resentful and causes a desire for revenge to sprout in us. This leads people create various harmful concepts like the one of “good discrimination” (i.e. because people from one group historically oppressed another group of people it is now good and just to reverse the process and oppress the former oppressors, as a group). If we lose control over it and let these feelings escalate, it will only lead to violence. And this is exactly what the Torah wants to prevent us from doing, at the very beginning of this entire process!  The essential part of it is forgiveness: if you want to be forgiven, you have to be able to forgive others, no matter what their identity is. The Torah teaches:

You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your countrymen. Love your fellow as yourself: I am the LORD. (Lev 19:18)

The concept of breaking the cycle of perpetual, mutual oppression has the same goal as other laws in our parasha, including these quoted above: to raise us to a higher civilizational level. Thus, let us not be fooled by all sorts of concepts that question the wisdom of the Torah and let us continue in the process of social and moral self-improvement.

 

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.