Ki Tavo

Gratitude as a Jewish value

Thoughts on parashat Ki Tavo

Menachem Mirski

What are the Jewish values? Typically, when this question is raised, the following values are mentioned: devotion to live in community (Israel), education (Torah), governance of life by law (halacha), truthfulness and trustworthiness (emunah), justice and righteousness (tzedek), kindness and taking care of others (chesed), respect and dignity (kavod) and responsibility (acharayut). They all have their social and their religious dimension, and traditionally they were all put under one umbrella: belief in God. They can also be put under another umbrella: fixing up the world (tikkun haolam).  These values are at the core of our Jewish religious system. They remain forever unchangeable despite changes in our rituals, customs, despite halachic changes and even some changes in Jewish ethics. These core values are the felt commitments of lived religion; they remain the same even though their ritual and practical expressions may change.

However, these core values are not completely immune to erosion: a change in religious practices may cause their erosion and disintegration. This danger never disappears (that’s one of the reasons there are those who object to any changes in our religion and tradition) and it was specifically acute in the early stages of our religion’s development, when judaism was particularly vulnerable to a damaging influence from surrounding cultures which did not share many of the values of our religion. That’s why we read in our Torah portion for this week:

If you do not obey the LORD your God to observe faithfully all His commandments and laws which I enjoin upon you this day, all these curses shall come upon you and take effect: Cursed shall you be in the city and cursed shall you be in the country. Cursed shall be your basket and your kneading bowl. Cursed shall be the issue of your womb and the produce of your soil, the calving of your herd and the lambing of your flock. Cursed shall you be in your comings and cursed shall you be in your goings. The LORD will let loose against you calamity, panic, and frustration in all the enterprises you undertake, so that you shall soon be utterly wiped out because of your evildoing in forsaking Me. The LORD will make pestilence cling to you, until He has put an end to you in the land that you are entering to possess. The LORD will strike you with consumption, fever, and inflammation, with scorching heat and drought, with blight and mildew; they shall hound you until you perish […] The LORD will bring a nation against you from afar, from the end of the earth, which will swoop down like the eagle—a nation whose language you do not understand, a ruthless nation, that will show the old no regard and the young no mercy. It shall devour the offspring of your cattle and the produce of your soil, until you have been wiped out, leaving you nothing of new grain, wine, or oil, of the calving of your herds and the lambing of your flocks, until it has brought you to ruin. It shall shut you up in all your towns throughout your land until every mighty, towering wall in which you trust has come down. And when you are shut up in all

your towns throughout your land that the LORD your God has assigned to you, you shall eat your own issue, the flesh of your sons and daughters that the LORD your God has assigned to you, because of the desperate straits to which your enemy shall reduce you. (Deuteronomy 28:15-22,49-53)

These are only 13 verses out of the entire 54-verse passage that tells about what will happen to the Israelites when they disobey the Eternal. Disobeying means questioning the Divine laws and wisdom and it basically means the same today.

This disobedience starts with mere ingratitude towards the Holy One, which is diagnosed at the beginning of our Torah portion, where it stresses the necessity of the annual, mass and solemn sacrifice of the firstfruits (Deuteronomy 26:1-11). Rabbi Yitzhak Breuer eloquently summed up various interpretations of this ritual:

The bikkurim brought every year are an unparalleled demonstration of a happy and blessed nation living on its land in quiet and security. It is a demonstration of the sovereignty of the Holy One over the nation, which each year accepts anew, with bended knee and with bowed head, the land from its God. In that tremendous national joy, the nation offers up its confession, a national confession stemming from national joy.

The Torah is deeply aware of one of the essential features of human nature: when people become well-off and have a leisurely life, they develop a tendency to become conceited and to rebel against the existing norms and rules of life, as we see in the following verses:

When you have eaten your fill, and have built fine houses to live in, and your herds and flocks have multiplied, and your silver and gold have increased, and everything you own has prospered, beware lest your heart grow haughty and you forget the LORD your God—who freed you from the land of Egypt, the house of bondage. (Deuteronomy 8:12-14)

It all ends by abandoning the true values and in idol worship – today this most often means worshiping money, power, position and technology – namely the products of human hands and minds: the things that should never be worshiped by man. The worst case scenario is worship of man himself – cult of personality. All this, at the end of the day, leads us to decadence and all that it brings: depression, destruction of the social fabric and the decay of social and cultural life.

The remedy lies in the constant and true practice of gratitude towards the Eternal, for everything that is given to us, including every moment of our life. Therefore, it can be said that gratitude to the Eternal is the foundation on which all our Jewish values arise.

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Ki Teitzei

Between collectivism and individualism

Thoughts on parashat Ki Teitzei

Menachem Mirski

I visited Poland over the last few weeks to perform my dad’s funeral and to help my mother to find herself living in new circumstances, without him. Not having a car throughout most of my four weeks’ trip I was dependent on public transportation. One day I got on the bus in Przemyśl and I went to the driver to get a ticket. I had no change in my wallet, so the driver could not sell me the ticket because he wasn’t able to give me the rest of the money. When I was walking back to my seat in the bus, an older, probably retired woman gave me 5 zloty and said “please go and buy this ticket”. I went back to the driver, got the ticket, thanked the woman and gave her back the rest.

Another day I got my mom a small tv so she could watch it at the rehab center she is currently in. She shares the room with three other women. She was very happy when she got it but her first instinct was to share it with others: “Put it please the way so the other women could also watch it”. I was thinking for a moment and then I said: “Well, if I do that, you won’t be able to watch it, only them”. “I can just listen to it” – she replied – “place it this way, at least for now”.

I’m bringing these stories because they show healthy collective thinking and actions. But is collective thinking always good and healthy? Is it something always recommended by our ‘community oriented’ religion?

Our Torah portion for this week contains the greatest number of laws among all the parashot: 72 positive and negative commandments. Among them are those pointing out to collective responsibility for one another in the society:

When you build a new house, you shall make a parapet for your roof, so that you do not bring bloodguilt on your house if anyone should fall from it. (Deuteronomy 22:8)

Another great example of good collective thinking are the laws of returning the lost animal/item:

If you see your fellow’s ox or sheep gone astray, do not ignore it; you must take it back to your fellow. If your fellow does not live near you or you do not know who he is, you shall bring it home and it shall remain with you until your fellow claims it; then you shall give it back to him. You shall do the same with his ass; you shall do the same with his garment; and so too shall you do with anything that your fellow loses and you find: you must not remain indifferent. If you see your fellow’s ass or ox fallen on the road, do not ignore it; you must help him raise it. (Deuteronomy 22:1-4)

Another set of laws teaches us social responsibility for the poor and needy:

When you reap the harvest in your field and overlook a sheaf in the field, do not turn back to get it; it shall go to the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow—in order that the LORD your God may bless you in all your undertakings. When you beat down the fruit of your olive trees, do not go over them again; that shall go to the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow. When you gather the grapes of your vineyard, do not pick it over again; that shall go to the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow. (Deuteronomy 24:19-21)

These laws are to teach us collective responsibility. I believe that most of them are to be internalized rather than enforced by the court due to the fact that situations of returning the lost item often do not involve more than one witness so their legal application is limited. But our parasha also contains commandments that definitely limit the scope of collective thinking and action:

Parents shall not be put to death for children, nor children be put to death for parents: a person shall be put to death only for his own crime. (Deuteronomy 24:16)

It is yet another expression of individual moral responsibility which is at the core of the Jewish concept of justice: if you do good you will be rewarded, if you do evil, you will be punished; nobody else should be punished for your sins, nobody else should be blamed for them and no man should be your scapegoat. If that happens, the system you have created is flawed and unjust.

Although it is not easy to make such a general statement, I believe that our religion is neither  individualist nor a purely collectivist in its nature. Both extremes, when applied exclusively, are harmful to society and human life. Radical individualism may cause indifference towards the needs and fate of others. Radical collectivism, not balanced by individual freedoms, brings forms group responsibility, which are never just and cause social conflicts as well as resentment, especially if mandated by force or the government. But most importantly, if something is ordained and enforced, it stops being voluntary. Thus, enforced collectivism often kills real, internalized, good collective thinking, together with empathy and compassion, which by its nature cannot be enforced by any law or system.

Collective thinking is always good when it’s voluntary.  A good, healthy life has both aspects, a collective and an individual one. It incorporates both perspectives in our daily life and chooses between them depending on the case. The laws in the Torah were given to us to teach us this necessary balance between what is individual and what is collective. These laws, together with maturity and experience, help us to know what perspective is appropriate in a given situation.

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Ki Teicei

Między kolektywizmem, a indywidualizmem

Refleksja nad paraszą Ki Teicei

Menachem Mirski

Ostatnich kilka tygodni spędziłem w Polsce. Musiałem wyjechać aby poprowadzić pogrzeb taty i pomóc mamie odnaleźć się w nowych warunkach, bez niego. Nie mając samochodu przez większość mojej czterotygodniowej podróży, byłem uzależniony od transportu publicznego. Pewnego dnia wsiadłem do autobusu w Przemyślu i poszedłem do kierowcy po bilet. Nie miałem w portfelu żadnych drobnych, więc kierowca nie mógł mi sprzedać biletu, ponieważ nie miał mi wydać. Kiedy wracałem na swoje miejsce w autobusie, starsza kobieta, prawdopodobnie emerytka dała mi 5 zł i powiedziała „proszę idź i kup sobie ten bilet”. Wróciłem do kierowcy, wziąłem bilet, podziękowałem kobiecie i oddałem jej resztę.

Innego dnia kupiłem mamie mały telewizor, żeby mogła go oglądać w ośrodku rehabilitacyjnym, w którym obecnie się znajduje. Mama dzieli pokój z trzema innymi kobietami. Była bardzo szczęśliwa, kiedy go dostała, ale jej pierwszym odruchem było podzielenie się nim z innymi: „Postaw go tak, aby inne panie też mogły oglądać”. Zastanawiałem się przez chwilę, po czym powiedziałem: „Jak go tak postawię, to ty nie będziesz mogła go oglądać, tylko inne panie”. „Mi wystarczy, że będę słyszeć” – odpowiedziała – „postaw go w ten sposób, przynajmniej na razie”.

Przytaczam te historie, ponieważ przedstawiają one zdrowe formy kolektywnego myślenia i działania. Ale czy myślenie kolektywne jest zawsze dobre i zdrowe? Czy zawsze  jest zalecane przez naszą „zorientowaną na społeczność” religię?

Porcja Tory na ten tydzień zawiera największą liczbę praw spośród wszystkich paraszy: jest w niej aż 72 pozytywnych i negatywnych przykazań. Wśród nich są takie, które wskazują na konieczność zbiorowej odpowiedzialności za siebie nawzajem w społeczeństwie:

Jeśli zbudujesz nowy dom, uczynisz na dachu ogrodzenie, byś nie obciążył swego domu krwią, gdyby ktoś z niego spadł (Pwt 21:8)

Innym dobrym przykładem zdrowego kolektywnego myślenia są prawa zwrotu utraconego zwierzęcia/przedmiotu:

Jeśli zobaczysz zbłąkanego wołu swego brata albo sztukę mniejszego bydła, nie odwrócisz się od nich, lecz zaprowadzisz je z powrotem do swego brata. Jeśli brat twój nie jest blisko ciebie i jeśli go nie znasz, zaprowadzisz je do swego domu, będą u ciebie, aż przyjdzie ich szukać twój brat i wtedy mu je oddasz. Tak postąpisz z jego osłem, tak postąpisz z jego płaszczem, tak postąpisz z każdą rzeczą zgubioną przez swego brata – z tym, co mu zginęło, a tyś odnalazł: nie możesz od tego się odwrócić. Jeśli zobaczysz, że osioł twego brata albo wół jego upadł na drodze – nie odwrócisz się od nich, ale z nim razem je podniesiesz. (Pwt 22:1-4)

Kolejny zestaw praw uczy nas społecznej odpowiedzialności za biednych i potrzebujących:

Jeśli będziesz żął we żniwa na swoim polu i zapomnisz snopka na polu, nie wrócisz się, aby go zabrać, lecz zostanie dla obcego, sieroty i wdowy, aby ci błogosławił Pan, Bóg twój, we wszystkim, co czynić będą twe ręce. Jeśli będziesz zbierał oliwki, nie będziesz drugi raz trząsł gałęzi; niech zostanie coś dla obcego, sieroty i wdowy. Gdy będziesz zbierał winogrona, nie szukaj powtórnie pozostałych winogron; niech zostaną dla obcego, sieroty i wdowy. (Pwt 24:19-21)

Prawa te mają nas nauczyć kolektywnej odpowiedzialności za siebie nawzajem. Uważam, że celem większości z nich ma być ich zinternalizowanie aniżeli miałyby być egzekwowane przez sąd, z prostego faktu, że sytuacje zwrotu utraconego przedmiotu często mają jedynie jednego świadka, a więc ich egzekucja prawna jest ograniczone. Ale nasza parsza zawiera również przykazania, które zdecydowanie ograniczają zakres kolektywnego myślenia i działania:

Ojcowie nie poniosą śmierci za winy synów ani synowie za winy swych ojców. Każdy umrze za swój własny grzech.  (Pwt 24:16)

Prawo to jest kolejnym wyrazem indywidualnej odpowiedzialności moralnej, która leży u podstaw żydowskiej koncepcji sprawiedliwości: jeśli czynisz dobro, zostaniesz nagrodzony, jeśli zrobisz zło, zostaniesz ukarany; nikt inny nie powinien być karany za twoje grzechy, nikt inny nie powinien być za nie obwiniany i żaden człowiek nie powinien być twoim kozłem ofiarnym. Jeśli tak się dzieje,  system, który stworzyłeś, jest wadliwy i niesprawiedliwy.

Chociaż nie jest rzeczą łatwą formułowanie tak ogólnych stwierdzeń, uważam, że nasza religia nie jest z natury ani indywidualistyczna, ani czysto kolektywistyczna. Obie skrajności, jeśli zastosowane jako jedyne, są szkodliwe dla społeczeństwa i życia ludzkiego. Radykalny indywidualizm może powodować obojętność na potrzeby i los innych. Radykalny kolektywizm, niezrównoważony wolnościami indywidualnymi, niesie ze sobą formy odpowiedzialności zbiorowej, które nigdy nie są sprawiedliwe i wywołują konflikty społeczne oraz resentymenty, zwłaszcza jeśli jest on wymuszony siłą lub przez rząd. Ale co najważniejsze, jeśli coś jest z góry zarządzone i egzekwowane, przestaje być dobrowolne. Tak więc wymuszony kolektywizm często zabija prawdziwe, zinternalizowane, dobre kolektywne myślenie, a także zabija empatię i współczucie, których, podług ich natury, nie można wymusić żadnym prawem ani systemem.

Kolektywne myślenie jest zawsze dobre, gdy jest dobrowolne. Dobre, zdrowe życie ma oba aspekty, kolektywny i indywidualny. Uwzględnia obie perspektywy w naszym codziennym doświadczeniu i wybiera między nimi w zależności od przypadku. Prawa zawarte w Torze zostały nam dane po to, aby nauczyć nas tej niezbędnej równowagi między tym, co indywidualne, a tym, co kolektywne. Te prawa, wraz z dojrzałością i doświadczeniem, pomagają nam rozpoznać, jaka perspektywa jest odpowiednia w danej sytuacji.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Szoftim

Poradnik, jak wyeliminować zło i niesprawiedliwość

Refleksja nad paraszą Szoftim

Menachem Mirski

Czy możliwe jest całkowite wyeliminowanie przestępczości z naszych społeczeństw?  A może da się wyeliminować tylko jeden rodzaj przestępstw, powiedzmy te najgorsze – morderstwa? Prawdopodobnie jest to możliwe. Można na przykład zamknąć  wszystkich ludzi w oddzielnych celach więziennych. Skonstruujmy nasze społeczeństwa w taki sposób. Wymagałoby to istnienia trzech kast społecznych: więźniów (powiedzmy 90% społeczeństwa), strażników (9%) i różnych administratorów i rządzących (1% albo jeszcze mniej). Gdyby popełniano jakiekolwiek morderstwa, to dochodziłoby do nich przede wszystkim w grupie walczących między sobą o władzę rządzących, którzy byliby jedynymi wolnymi ludźmi w takim społeczeństwie. Morderstwo byłoby zjawiskiem dotyczącym nie więcej niż 1% ludności, a zatem liczba morderstw byłaby prawdopodobnie o wiele niższa niż w naszych współczesnych społeczeństwach. A kogo obchodziłoby, że oni zabijają się nawzajem. Oni, ten 1% ludności, byliby prawdopodobnie najbardziej znienawidzoną grupą w całym społeczeństwie.

Albo może stwórzmy lepszy system. Na przykład w USA 93% osadzonych w więzieniach to mężczyźni. Znaczna większość morderców była już wcześniej uwikłanych w jakiegoś rodzaju działalność kryminalną. Wprowadźmy więc kodeks karny, zgodnie z którym nawet najmniejsze przestępstwo będzie karane dożywotnim więzieniem. Bądźmy wspaniałomyślni i stwórzmy inny kodeks karny dla kobiet, które stanowią tylko malutką mniejszość wszystkich kryminalistów, spożywają mniej alkoholu i biorą mniej narkotyków, które są bezpośrednią przyczyną wielu przestępstw z użyciem przemocy; w przypadku kobiet zachodzi też mniejsze ryzyko recydywy.  Kobiety radzą sobie też przeciętnie lepiej w szkole i rzadziej bywają bezdomne. Jest wiele argumentów przemawiających za tym, że w kwestii przestępstw nie powinny być traktowane równie ostro, co mężczyźni.

Stwórzmy tego rodzaju system społeczny. Praktycznie zniknęłyby wtedy nie tylko morderstwa, ale również wiele przestępstw mniejszego kalibru. Na czym więc polega problem, dlaczego nie możemy tego zrobić?

Czytana w tym tygodniu porcja Tory zaczyna się od wezwania do ustanowienia instytucji strzegących przestrzegania prawa: sędziów (wodzów, hebr. szoftim) i urzędników (hebr. szotrim):

Sędziów i urzędników ustanowisz sobie we wszystkich bramach twoich, które Wiekuisty, Bóg twój, da tobie w pokoleniach twoich, aby sądzili lud sądem sprawiedliwym. (Pwt 16, 18)

Bezpośrednio po tym Tora wymienia podstawowe zasady rządów prawa:

Nie skrzywiaj prawa, nie uwzględniaj osoby, a nie bierz wziątku, bo wziątek zaślepia mądrych i plącze słowa sprawiedliwych. (Pwt 16, 19)

Tutaj Tora zabrania przekupstwa, ale zasady sprawiedliwego procesu są omawiane w innym jej miejscu:

Nie czyńcie krzywdy w sądzie, nie uwzględniaj osoby biednego, ani uszanuj osoby możnego; sprawiedliwe sądź bliźniego twego. (Kpł 19, 15)

albo na początku księgi Powtórzonego Prawa:

I rozkazałem sędziom waszym podówczas, mówiąc: Wysłuchajcie między bracią waszą, i rozsądzajcie sprawiedliwie między człowiekiem a powinowatym jego, a cudzoziemcem przy nim. Nie uwzględniajcie osób na sądzie; tak małego jako wielkiego wysłuchajcie; nie obawiajcie się nikogo, albowiem sąd od Boga jest; sprawę zaś, która by za trudną była dla was, odnieście do mnie, a przesłucham ją.  (Pwt 1, 16-17)

Nasza porcja Tory na ten tydzień kończy swoje wezwanie o sprawiedliwość jeszcze innym apelem:

Za sprawiedliwością, za sprawiedliwością podążaj, abyś żył i posiadał ziemię, którą Wiekuisty, Bóg twój, oddaje tobie. (Pwt 16, 20)

Cedek, Cedek tidrof… Użyty tu hebrajski czasownik lidrof oznacza być z tyłu, iść za czymś, podążać za czymś, prześladować, gonić za czymś. Dokładnie – sprawiedliwość jest czymś, za czym będziesz podążać. A nie czymś, co „ustanowisz”. Tora zdaje sobie sprawę z odpowiedzi, którą zasugerowałem implicite na początku: że całkowite wyeliminowanie niesprawiedliwości ze świata jest niemożliwe, gdyż wymagałoby to wyeliminowania litości, miłości i współczucia i nałożyłoby to ogromne ograniczenia na ludzką wolność. Bóg, według Tory, nigdy nie zamierzał stworzyć takiego rodzaju świata. Prawdopodobnie nikt nie chciałby żyć w takim świecie za wyjątkiem jakichś psychopatów.

Sprawiedliwość nie jest czymś, co można zarządzić za pomocą jakiegoś dekretu. Jest to nigdy niekończący się proces. Niesprawiedliwość nie jest zatem problemem, który można naprawić w taki sposób, w jaki możemy naprawić samochód albo samolot: poprzez naprawę nieprawidłowo działającego systemu. Sprawiedliwość społeczna, choć jest nie mniej skomplikowana niż samolot, zawiera w sobie inny kluczowy i nieobliczalny element: wolność ludzkich decyzji. Tego elementu nie da się wyeliminować.

Owszem, pewne formy niesprawiedliwości zostały wyeliminowane na przestrzeni historii – jak choćby niewolnictwo. Ale nie zostało ono wyeliminowane całkowicie – są targi niewolników w Libii, dochodzi też do innych form ludzkiego zniewolenia, które mogą być uznane za niewolnictwo – na przykład w Chinach. Nie wspominając już o Korei Północnej, gdzie całe społeczeństwo jest zakładnikiem grupy szalonych despotów. Niewolnictwa nie wyeliminowano też na trwałe w miejscach, gdzie zostało ono zniesione; nie ma gwarancji, że kiedy sprawy na świecie przyjmą bardzo zły obrót, niektóre dawne praktyki oparte wyłącznie na dominacji i władzy nie zostaną przywrócone, nawet za przyzwoleniem całych narodów. A zatem nie powinniśmy nigdy lekceważyć tego, co udało nam się – jako ludzkości – osiągnąć.

Z tych samych powodów – czyli ludzkiej wolności podejmowania decyzji i jej fundamentalnej wartości – ani zło, ani ludzka skłonność do zła nigdy nie zniknęły. Żeby pozbyć się (moralnego) zła na świecie, musielibyśmy naprawić tak zwaną ludzką naturę, jak uważali prorocy. Rabiniczne poglądy w sprawie jecer hatow – skłonności do dobra – i jecer hara – skłonności do zła – są bardziej rozwinięte i bardziej przydatne z praktycznego punktu widzenia: nie twierdzą, że jecer hara powinna zostać wyeliminowana. Zgodnie z poglądami rabinicznymi w tej kwestii celem jest wykorzystanie owych złych, niemożliwych do wykorzenienia skłonności w taki sposób, aby działały na rzecz dobrych celów. Filozofia ta, poza tym iż ma pozytywny charakter, jest również łatwiejsza do wdrożenia w życie, kiedy odpowiednio się ją zrozumie: może przybrać formę „przeprogramowania” swojego mózgu, tak aby zmodyfikować swoje odruchy i wywoływane przez nie procesy w taki sposób, żeby działały na rzecz osiągnięcia pożądanych rezultatów.

W moim przekonaniu jest to lepsze podejście niż nienawidzenie zła i niesprawiedliwości. Nienawidzenie zła i niesprawiedliwości sprowadza się ostatecznie do nienawidzenia czegoś należącego do ludzkiej natury. A zatem bardzo ważne jest, żeby ściśle zdefiniować tę rzecz, która ponoć wywołuje całe zło, z którym walczymy. Bardzo ważne jest, żeby precyzyjnie ją zdefiniować i upewnić się, że ten element nie jest czymś, co w rzeczywistości jest w swej istocie dobre, tak jak pragnienie wolności czy ambicja, albo nawet czymś relatywnie dobrym, tak jak rywalizacja czy współzawodnictwo. Jeśli coś jest relatywnie dobre, to zasadniczo należy do sfery leżącej poza dobrem i złem. Jest to bardziej rodzaj narzędzia, a narzędzia bywają często pożyteczne.

Powinniśmy pamiętać o wszystkich wyżej opisanych kwestiach, kiedy dyskutujemy nad innymi negatywnymi zjawiskami społecznymi, z którymi się zmagamy i które chcemy wykorzenić, takimi jak korupcja, kradzieże, rasizm albo uprzedzenia. Aby kompletnie je wyeliminować, musielibyśmy zastosować podobne rozwiązania jak te, które byłyby potrzebne do wyeliminowania morderstw (ale, jako że są to lżejsze przewinienia, prawdopodobnie nie musielibyśmy wprowadzać ich we wszystkich sferach ludzkiego życia). Nie możemy prawnie wyeliminować błędnych form myślenia i mówienia, nie ograniczając przy tym wolności myśli i wypowiedzi. Możemy zminimalizować je i ich negatywne skutki poprzez odpowiednią edukację, ale tylko do pewnego stopnia i w takim stopniu, w jakim oferowana przez nas edukacja będzie odpowiednia – nie możemy też całkowicie wyeliminować błędów z naszego nauczania.

Tak jak pokazałem na początku, wyeliminowanie jednego rodzaju zła, jednego rodzaju niesprawiedliwości tutaj i teraz wymagałoby totalitarnych rozwiązań. Jest to prawdopodobnie jeden z powodów, dlaczego ludzie, którzy  mają obsesje na punkcie tylko jednego albo dwóch konkretnych rodzajów zła albo którzy bardzo wąsko definiują, co jest najgorszym złem na świecie (a co często nie jest najgorszym złem, a czasem w ogóle nie jest czymś złym), wykształcają w sobie skłonność do totalitarnego myślenia. Sądzę, że częścią odpowiedniego nastawienia wobec zła i niesprawiedliwości jest zdolność postrzegania wielu różnych rodzajów zła i niesprawiedliwości i umieszczenie ich w jakiegoś rodzaju hierarchii, tak jak robimy to z rzeczami, które uważamy za dobre i sprawiedliwe. Nie oznacza to, że różni ludzie nie powinni się specjalizować w walce z konkretnymi rodzajami niesprawiedliwości albo zła. Powinni. Ale bardzo dobre i zdrowe jest również postrzeganie zła, cierpienia i niesprawiedliwości, z którymi walczymy, w kontekście zła, cierpienia i niesprawiedliwości, z którymi walczą inni ludzie.

 

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA

 

Tłum. Marzena Szymańska-Błotnicka

Ekev

The importance of human experience

Thoughts on parashat Ekev

Menachem Mirski

This week’s Torah portion includes a beautiful vision of the Promised Land, spoken through the mouth of Moses on the eve of its conquest:

For the LORD your God is bringing you into a good land, a land with streams and springs and fountains issuing from plain and hill; a land of wheat and barley, of vines, figs, and pomegranates, a land of olive trees and honey; a land where you may eat food without stint, where you will lack nothing; a land whose rocks are iron and from whose hills you can mine copper. When you have eaten your fill, give thanks to the LORD your God for the good land which He has given you. (Deuteronomy 8:7-10)

Rabbinic minds developed this vision of Eretz Israel by exceedingly idealizing the Promised Land. For example, Rabbeinu Bachya believed that the land of Israel, as well as Jerusalem itself in particular, contained all six climates of the world, which rendered the land’s climate as marvelous. Gaon of Vilna believed that the land of Israel contained all possible minerals and all the plants people needed, so there was no need to import anything. The rabbis, however, idealized the land of Israel even more. The nineteenth-century rabbi of Bratislava, Moses Schreiber, in his work Chatam Sofer wrote that fruits of Eretz Israel were tremendously large, as, for example, wheat grains the size of ox kidneys and lentils the size of gold dinars. Rabbi Shlomo Efraim Luntschitz, who lived at the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries, in his work Kli Yakar claimed that Eretz Israel does not need storage cities; it always has abundance, and there is no need to save from one year to another – its crop is blessed every year, without a break.  Other 19th and 20th-century commentators, such as Jehuda Arie Leib Alter and Shabbatai HaKohen, have argued, for example, that bread made from grains of the Land of Israel has miraculous properties: it can be eaten in infinite amounts, without fear of gaining weight.

There was a disagreement regarding whether the streams and fountains could itself provide enough water for irrigation of fields. 13th century French commentator, Hezekiah ben Manoah, known as Chizkuni, believed that the abundance of water in these streams and fountains depend on rainfall, thus each individual will have to trust in God’s grace for his water. Nachmanides, however, saw a natural blessing in them and that they carry enough moisture to every place it is needed, therefore the land needed no rivers, nor a specific ‘water engineering’.

The first Zionists emigrating to Eretz Israel in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries found out how true all these visions were. These visions do not correspond to reality even today: yes, Israel is a very developed country, abundant in various goods, but all this is the result of hard work of many generations. These rabbinical visions actually teach us how important human experience is when it comes to knowing and judging reality, and how easy it is to make a mistake when one does not have such an experience. These commentators have spent their entire lives in a different world, in Europe, only fantasizing about the Promised Land. The same is often true today, due to instant access to information on everything that is happening anywhere in the world: people are constantly tempted to form and express themselves their opinions about places and countries, having in fact no idea about the reality of these places. Let it be a lesson of restraint for us; let us be restrained in our words, concepts and recipes for the life of human communities who live in other countries and on different continents.

 

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Ekew

 Znaczenie ludzkiego doświadczenia

Refleksja nad paraszą Ekew

 

Menachem Mirski

Porcja Tory na ten tydzień zawiera piękną wizję Ziemi Obiecanej, wypowiedzianą ustami Mojżesza w przededniu jej podbicia:

Albowiem Pan, Bóg twój, wprowadzi cię do ziemi pięknej, ziemi obfitującej w potoki, źródła i strumienie, które tryskają w dolinie oraz na górze – do ziemi pszenicy, jęczmienia, winorośli, drzewa figowego i granatowego – do ziemi oliwek, oliwy i miodu – do ziemi, gdzie nie odczuwając niedostatku, nasycisz się chlebem, gdzie ci niczego nie zabraknie – do ziemi, której kamienie zawierają żelazo, a z jej gór wydobywa się miedź. Najesz się, nasycisz i będziesz błogosławił Pana, Boga twego, za piękną ziemię, którą ci dał. (Pwt 8:7-10)

Rabiniczne umysły rozwinęły tę wizję Erec Israel niezwykle idealizując ziemię obiecaną. Przykładowo, Rabbeinu Bachja wierzył, że ziemia Izraela, jak i sama Jerozolima w szczególności, zawiera wszystkie sześć klimatów świata, co czyniło ogólny klimat kraju zjawiskowym, cudownym. Gaon z Wilna wierzył, że ziemia Izraela zawierała wszystkie możliwe minerały i wszystkie niezbędne człowiekowi rośliny, dzięki czemu nie trzeba było niczego importować. Rabini jednak idealizowali ziemię Izraela jeszcze bardziej. XIX wieczny rabin Bratysławy, Moses Schreiber, w swoim dziele Chatam Sofer pisał, że owoce Erec Israel były niezwykle duże, jak na przykład ziarna pszenicy wielkości nerek wołu i soczewica wielkości złotych dinarów. Żyjący na przełomie wieków XVI i XVII praski rabin Szlomo Efraim Luntschitz, w swoim dziele Kli Jakar twierdził, że Eretz Israel nie potrzebuje ‘miast magazynowych’; zawsze jest wszystkiego pod dostatkiem i nie ma potrzeby robienia zapasów z roku na rok – plony są w tej ziemi zawsze i nieprzerwanie błogosławione. Natomiast inni, XIX i XX wieczni komentatorzy, jak Jehuda Arie Leib Alter czy Shabbatai HaKohen, twierdzili na przykład, że chleb produkowany ze zbóż Ziemi Izraela ma cudowne właściwości: nie można od niego utyć i można go jeść w bezgranicznych ilościach.

Nie było zgody co do tego, czy owe strumienie i fontanny tryskające tu i ówdzie mogą zapewnić wystarczającą ilość wody do nawadniania pól. XIII-wieczny komentator francuski, Ezechiasz ben Manoach, znany jako Chizkuni, uważał, że obfitość wody w strumieniach i fontannach Izraela zależy od opadów deszczu, dlatego każdy człowiek będzie musiał ufać Bożej łasce w kwestii dostępnej wody. Nachmanides jednak widział w nich naturalne błogosławieństwo i twierdził, że niosą wystarczającą ilość wilgoci do każdego miejsca, w którym jest potrzebna, dlatego ziemia ta nie potrzebowała rzek, ani specyficznych systemów.

O tym, jak prawdziwe były te wszystkie wizje przekonali się pierwsi syjoniści emigrujący do Erec Israel w XIX i XX wieku. Wizje te nie przystają do rzeczywistości także dziś: owszem Izrael jest krajem niezwykle rozwiniętym i obfitującym w dobra, ale wszystko to jest plonem ciężkiej pracy wielu pokoleń. Owe wizje rabiniczne, pouczają nas tak naprawdę o tym, jak ważnym elementem w poznaniu i sądzeniu rzeczywistości jest ludzkie doświadczenie, i jak łatwo o błąd, gdy się takiego doświadczenia nie ma. Wspomniani komentatorzy spędzili całe swoje życie w innym świecie, w Europie, o Ziemi Obiecanej, niestety, jedynie fantazjując. Podobnie rzecz ma się współcześnie. Jest to spowodowane błyskawicznym dostępem do informacji na temat wszystkiego co się gdziekolwiek na świecie dzieje: ludzie stale mają pokusę wypowiadania się i formowania sobie opinii o miejscach i krajach o których rzeczywistości nie mają tak naprawdę żadnego pojęcia. Niech więc będzie to dla nas lekcja powściągliwości, w naszych słowach, koncepcjach i receptach na życie społeczności ludzkich, którzy żyją w innych krajach i na różnych kontynentach.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Matot-Massei

Finish What You Start

Thoughts on Parashat Matot-Massei

Menachem Mirski

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe,” Albert Einstein reportedly said. He also said that “Nothing happens until something moves.” Indeed, constant movement seems to be the essence of everything. This is one of the few empirical truths we should also consider as normative. To stop, to do nothing, is a fundamental violation of the principle that governs the entire universe. If you violate this principle, if you stop, you won’t have to wait long for the consequences.

In the story from this week’s parasha, two of the Israelite tribes did, in fact, try to stop short. After settling in the favorable piece of land on the eastern side of the Jordan River, Reubenites and Gadites decided that they didn’t have to conquer the Promised Land, that they could just stay where they were – it was good enough:

The Reubenites and the Gadites owned cattle in very great numbers. Noting that the lands of Jazer and Gilead were a region suitable for cattle, the Gadites and the Reubenites came to Moses, Eleazar the priest, and the chieftains of the community, and said, “Ataroth, Dibon, Jazer, Nimrah, Heshbon, Elealeh, Sebam, Nebo, and Beon— the land that the LORD has conquered for the community of Israel is cattle country, and your servants have cattle. It would be a favor to us,” they continued, “if this land were given to your servants as a holding; do not move us across the Jordan.” (Num 32:1-5)

Upon hearing their plea, Moses rebukes them saying that they were committing the same sin as the Isrealites when they took the advice of the spies who, after exploring the Promised Land, discouraged all the people of Israel from conquering it, which resulted in God punishing them with an additional 40 years of wandering in the desert.

After Moses reminded them of this punishment (Num 32:10-14), the Gadites and Reubenites humble themselves under the Divine “threat”. They assure both Moses and God that although they will secure the well-being of their families and flocks in territories already conquered on the eastern side of the Jordan river, they will join their brethren in the conquest of “the core part” of the Promised Land, located on the west side of the river. The promise they make ultimately dismisses the Divine wrath.

This Divine anger is a punishment that happens when we withdraw from an effort, and this is how the story can be understood today. The principle of the story being: never stop halfway along the path you have taken, even if what you have achieved is satisfying enough. Be true to your original goals and intentions and follow through. Do not be fooled by temporary prosperity and stability, because what you already perceive as your reward may, in the near future, in fact, become a punishment. At best, you will plunge into boredom. Then you will regret not taking the next step. You will regret that you lacked the courage and wonder what you could have achieved, especially if the opportunity disappears. Also, never set a goal of just being happy, because that doesn’t really mean anything and what is worse is you can be sure that you are unaware of what will actually make you happy unless you continue to make, work toward and achieve your goals. Happiness is a feeling that accompanies our achievements. We achieve happiness when we achieve the goals we have set ourselves and even if you are unable to ever “feel” happy you will have a sense of accomplishment, of making a difference in the world. We are fundamentally narrative creatures; the essence of our existence is to constantly move forward. The only end point is death. Even if we are very successful and achieve all our goals, the moment we achieve them, we envision the next ones (if we don’t we must envision them). In all you do, reach for the Promised Land and don’t stop… ever, reaching… because none of our goals are, in fact, final.

Shabbat shalom

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Matot-Masei

Nie zatrzymuj się w połowie drogi

Refleksja nad paraszą Matot-Masei

 Menachem Mirski

“Tylko dwie rzeczy są nieskończone: wszechświat oraz ludzka głupota, choć nie jestem pewien co do tej pierwszej”. – powiedział ponoć Albert Einstein. Einstein powiedział też, iż „Nic się nie dzieje, dopóki coś się nie poruszy”. W istocie, ciągły ruch wydaje się być istotą wszystkiego co istnieje we wszechświecie. Jest to jedna z niewielu prawd empirycznych, które powinniśmy uznać również za normatywne. Zatrzymanie się, nie robienie niczego, jest fundamentalnym naruszeniem zasady rządzącej całym wszechświatem. Jeśli naruszysz tę zasadę i przestaniesz robić cokolwiek, nie będziesz musiał długo czekać na konsekwencje.

W historii z naszej paraszy na ten tydzień, dwa spośród izraelskich plemion próbują się zatrzymać i poprzestać na tym, co już mają. Po osiedleniu się na dogodnym kawałku ziemi po wschodniej stronie Jordanu, Rubenici i Gadyci zdecydowali, że nie muszą podbijać Ziemi Obiecanej, że mogą po prostu pozostać tam, gdzie są:

Rubenici i Gadyci posiadali liczne i bardzo duże stada. Gdy ujrzeli krainę Jezer i Gilead, uznali, że ta okolica nadaje się bardzo do hodowli bydła. Podeszli więc i tak mówili do Mojżesza, kapłana Eleazara i książąt społeczności: «Atarot, Dibon, Jazer i Nimra, Cheszbon, Eleale, Sibma, Nebo i Beon, kraj, który Wiekuisty oddał społeczności Izraela, nadaje się szczególnie do hodowli bydła, a twoi słudzy posiadają [wiele] bydła». Potem mówili dalej: «Jeśli darzysz nas życzliwością, oddaj tę krainę w posiadanie sługom swoim. Nie prowadź nas przez Jordan! (Lb 32:1-5)

Mojżesz usłyszawszy tę prośbę gani ich, mówiąc, że popełnili ten sam grzech, co Izraelici, którzy posłuchali rady szpiegów powracających z Ziemi Obiecanej, którzy zniechęcili cały lud Izraela do jej podboju, w rezultacie czego Bóg ukarał ich dodatkowymi 40 latami wędrówki po pustyni. Po tym, jak Mojżesz przypomina im o tej karze (Lb 32:10-14), Gadyci i Rubenici korzą się pod tą groźbą. Zapewniają zarówno Mojżesza, jak i Boga, że chociaż zapewnią byt rodzinom oraz stadom na terenach już podbitych, po wschodniej stronie Jordanu, dołączą do swoich braci w podboju „zasadniczej części” Ziemi Obiecanej, położonej po zachodniej stronie Jordanu. Obietnica ta ostatecznie oddala Boski gniew.

Ów Boski gniew jest karą, która spotyka nas zawsze gdy cofamy się przed wysiłkiem i w taki sposób można rozumieć tę historię dzisiaj. Zasada płynąca z takiego jej rozumienia brzmiałaby następująco: nigdy nie zatrzymuj się w połowie drogi, którą sobie obrałeś, nawet wtedy (lub zwłaszcza wtedy), kiedy to co osiągnąłeś już cię satysfakcjonuje. Pamiętaj o swoich pierwotnych celach i zamierzeniach, i podążaj za nimi. Nie daj się zwieść tymczasowemu dobrobytowi i stabilizacji, bowiem to, w czym już widzisz swoją nagrodę, może w niedalekiej przyszłości stać się dla ciebie karą. W najlepszym przypadku – pogrążysz się w nudzie. Wtedy będziesz żałował, że nie zdecydowałeś się na następny krok. Będziesz żałował, że zabrakło ci odwagi i że nie poszedłeś dalej, zwłaszcza jeśli takowa możliwość przestała istnieć. Nigdy też nie stawiaj sobie za cel być po prostu szczęśliwym, bo to nic nie znaczy (i możesz nawet nie być całkowicie świadomym tego, co naprawdę uczyni cię szczęśliwym). Poczucie szczęścia jest uczuciem towarzyszącym naszym osiągnięciom: mamy je wtedy, gdy osiągamy cele, które sobie założyliśmy. Jesteśmy z gruntu istotami “narracyjnymi”: istotą naszej egzystencji jest ciągłe przemieszczanie się z punktu A do punktu B. Jeśli przestaniemy to robić i zatrzymamy się w jakimś punkcie na dłuższy czas, zostaniemy wkrótce ukarani, ponieważ odrzuciliśmy rozwój. Jedynym punktem końcowym w życiu jest śmierć. Nawet jeśli jesteśmy pełni sukcesów i osiągamy wszystkie założone przez nas cele, w momencie, gdy je osiągamy, widzimy już następne (a jeśli ich nie widzimy, to powinniśmy). A zatem nigdy nie ustawajmy w naszych dążeniach i celach, ponieważ żadne z nich nie są w rzeczywistości ostateczne.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Parashat Pinchas

Not in an Earthquake You Will Find Me but in a Soft, Murmuring Sound

Thoughts on Parashat Pinchas

 

Menachem Mirski

Is there a general rule of how we should deal with evil? Should we fight back, respond with poker face or with doing good to an evildoer, hoping that he will become aware of the wickedness of his behavior and will return to the right path? The answers to these questions are dependent on what we believe about the nature of evil: does evil exist objectively? Or maybe certain human actions are only evil ‘in our eyes’ – we only perceive them as evil and call them so. It also depends on what we believe about bad people: can someone be evil simply by nature or are the so-called bad people merely misguided?

Generally speaking, this is an endless debate, with lots of arguments for and against this and that position. It is good, however, to have an elaborated opinion on that topic because we never know when we find ourselves interacting with, God forbid, real, genuine evil. Thus, let us, religious Jews, look into the Torah for hints, especially because our Torah portion for this week also deals with this problem.

Our parasha starts with the story of Pinchas’ divine reward. Pinchas, grandson of Aaron, was rewarded with the eternal priesthood for killing another Israelite – the Simeonite prince Zimri – as well as the Midianite princess who was his paramour. It all happened after “the Israelite people profaned themselves by whoring with the Moabite women, who invited the people to the sacrifices for their god” (Numbers 25:1-2). Although that may sound at least controversial to our modern ears, both our Sages and biblical commentators believe that the slaying of Zimri was correct. Not recommended, but correct. Halachically speaking it was the case of halacha ve’ein morin ken – a halacha we do not teach. Although our sages in tractate Sanhedrin consider excommunicating Pinchas for his deed, commentators like Rashi, Ramban, Kli Yakar portray Pinchas as a hero, who actually deserves praise because he did the right thing risking his own life for the sake the Torah.

Therefore, what Pinchas did was correct, but the act of execution itself was beyond the norms of Jewish ethics and Jewish law. The story of Pinchas is often compared to the one of prophet Elijah, who killed 450 prophets of Baal, as we find in I Kings 18:40:

Then Elijah said to them, “Seize the prophets of Baal, let not a single one of them get away.” They seized them, and Elijah took them down to the Wadi Kishon and slaughtered them there. (I Kings 18:40)

Right after that Elijah runs away from king Ahab, because his wife, Jezebel, swears to avenge the murdered prophets and kill him. But Elijah’s behavior goes beyond fearing for his life. He is indeed very sorrowful in the aftermath of what he did. Being hungry and parched he wishes to die on the desert:

Frightened, he fled at once for his life. He came to Beer-sheba, which is in Judah, and left his servant there; he himself went a day’s journey into the wilderness. He came to a broom bush and sat down under it, and prayed that he might die. “Enough!” he cried. “Now, O LORD, take my life, for I am no better than my fathers.” He lay down and fell asleep under a broom bush. Suddenly an angel touched him and said to him, “Arise and eat.” He looked about; and there, beside his head, was a cake baked on hot stones and a jar of water! He ate and drank, and lay down again. (I Kings 19:3-6)

Elijah is on his way to mount Horeb (Sinai). He goes there for 40 days and 40 nights because he wishes to relive the Sinai experience and return to what is the proper, Divine path. God saves Elijah’s life and shows him His ways:

“Come out,” He called, “and stand on the mountain before the LORD.” And lo, the LORD passed by. There was a great and mighty wind, splitting mountains and shattering rocks by the power of the LORD; but the LORD was not in the wind. After the wind—an earthquake; but the LORD was not in the earthquake. After the earthquake—fire; but the LORD was not in the fire. And after the fire—a soft murmuring sound. (I Kings 19:11-12)

The passage above tells us what are the ways of the Holy One and how should people who follow His ways conduct. Even though all these phenomena were caused by the Divine power, God was not in them; God was not in the wind, nor in the earthquake, nor in the fire. God was in this what happened at the end – He was in a soft, murmuring sound. This is to teach us that in God’s eyes the appropriate action involves calmness and forethought.

In that kind of considerate, calm and patient manner we should approach evil, which exists objectively. Generally speaking, it means that we should never allow evil to dominate our minds and our behavior. The rest depends on the situation. Sometimes we need to fight back, sometimes we need to remain indifferent and sometimes we need to respond to evil with good. Everything depends on the magnitude of evil and the power dynamic between the parties involved: if power is on our side and our life and well being is not endangered, then we definitely have a luxury to respond to evil with good. If the situation is equal, it’s usually better to retain poker face and negotiate, to try to take someone away from the wrong path, to stave off bad intentions and plans. If power is on the side of evil doers, we don’t have much of a choice, and that was basically the case of Pinchas.

The kind of killing that Pinchas or Elijah did was not justified already in rabbinic times, let alone today – it would be considered a murder. But both stories contain one more message: every social conflict that escalates can reach its tipping point after which there is no return. After reaching that point there is only violence and this violence becomes justified in the eyes of each party that decides it is the last resort. We have no a priori knowledge about when this tipping point will be reached. Therefore, in our turbulent times, we need to at least hear the arguments of ‘the other side’ and treat them seriously, for the sake of peace. The more we do in this matter, the better. Even though peace can be sometimes sacrificed for the sake of truth, it is still in the interest of each party – peace is in the interest of all humanity and above all the “tribal” interests.

Shabbat shalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.

Pinchas

Nie w trzęsieniu ziemi znajdziesz Mnie, ale w cichym, mruczącym dźwięku

Refleksja nad paraszą Pinchas

Menachem Mirski

Jak należy postępować w obliczu zła? Czy powinniśmy żarliwie wobec niego oponować? Zachować pokerową twarz? A może odpowiedzieć wykazując się właściwym zachowaniem, etycznym zachowaniem i zrobić dla złoczyńcy dobry uczynek w nadziei, że uświadomi sobie niegodziwość swojego zachowania i wróci na właściwą ścieżkę? Odpowiedzi na te pytania zależą od tego, co wierzymy na temat natury zła, na przykład, czy zło istnieje obiektywnie? A może jest tak, że pewne ludzkie działania są złem jedynie „w naszych oczach” – my tylko postrzegamy je jako zło i w ten sposób je nazywamy. Wiele zależy również od naszych przekonań o tzw “złych ludziach”: czy możliwe, że ktoś może być po prostu “zły z natury”, czy może ludzie ci po prostu zbłądzili?

Ta debata oczywiście nie ma końca i zawiera wiele argumentów za i przeciw takiemu i owemu stanowisku. Dobrze jest jednak mieć wypracowaną opinię na ten temat, ponieważ nigdy nie wiadomo, kiedy możemy stanąć w obliczu realnego, prawdziwego zła. A ponieważ jesteśmy religijnymi Żydami, przyjrzyjmy się temu co mówi na ten temat Tora.

Nasza parasza zaczyna się od opowieści o boskiej nagrodzie dla Pinchasa. Pinchas, wnuk Aarona, został nagrodzony wiecznym kapłaństwem za zabicie innego Izraelity –  Zimriego, księcia Symeonitów – oraz księżniczki Madianitów, która była jego kochanką. Wszystko to wydarzyło się po tym, jak „naród izraelski począł uprawiać nierząd z córkami Moabu, które zapraszały ów lud do składania ofiar swoim bogom i oddawania swoim bogom pokłonów” (Liczb 25:1-2). I choć dla naszych współczesnych uszu może to zabrzmieć co najmniej kontrowersyjnie, zarówno nasi mędrcy, jak i biblijni komentatorzy uważają, że zabicie Zimriego było słuszne. Niezalecane, ale właściwe. Halachicznie rzecz ujmując mamy tu do czynienia z przypadkiem halacha ve’ein morin ken – jest to halacha, której nie uczymy. I chociaż nasi mędrcy w traktacie Sanhedryn rozważają ekskomunikowanie Pinchasa za jego czyn, komentatorzy tacy jak Raszi, Ramban, Kli Yakar przedstawiają Pinchasa jako bohatera, który w rzeczywistości zasługuje na uznanie i pochwałę, nie tylko dlatego, że postąpił słusznie, ale także dla tego, że dla Tory gotów był zaryzykować własnym życiem.

A zatem to, co zrobił Pinchas, było słuszne, jednakże sam akt egzekucji wykraczał poza normy żydowskiej etyki i żydowskiego prawa. Historia Pinchasa jest często porównywana do historii proroka Eliasza, który zabił 450 proroków Baala, o czym czytamy w I Księdze Królewskiej 18:40:

Eliasz zaś im rozkazał: «Chwytajcie proroków Baala! Niech nikt z nich nie ujdzie!» Zaraz więc ich schwytali. Eliasz zaś sprowadził ich do potoku Kiszon i tam ich wytracił. (I Krl 18:40)

Zaraz potem Eliasz ucieka przed królem Achabem, ponieważ jego żona Jezebel poprzysięga pomścić zamordowanych proroków i go zabić. Jednakże zachowanie proroka wykracza poza strach o własne życie; jest on bardzo zatrwożony i zasmucony po tym, co uczynił. W głodzie i spiekocie pustyni postanawia umrzeć:

Wtedy Eliasz zląkłszy się, powstał i ratując się ucieczką, przyszedł do Beer-Szeby w Judzie i tam zostawił swego sługę, a sam na [odległość] jednego dnia drogi poszedł na pustynię. Przyszedłszy, usiadł pod jednym z janowców i pragnąc umrzeć, rzekł: «Wielki już czas, o Wiekuisty! Odbierz mi życie, bo nie jestem lepszy od moich przodków». Po czym położył się tam i zasnął. A oto anioł, trącając go, powiedział mu: «Wstań, jedz!» Eliasz spojrzał, a oto przy jego głowie podpłomyk i dzban z wodą. Zjadł więc i wypił, i znów się położył. (I Krl 19:3-6)

Eliasz jest w drodze na górę Horeb (Synaj). Wędruje przez 40 dni i 40 nocy, by ponownie przeżyć doświadczenie Synaju i powrócić na właściwą, Boską ścieżkę. Bóg ratuje życie Eliasza i przedstawia mu drogi Wiekuistego:

Wtedy rzekł: «Wyjdź, aby stanąć na górze wobec Wiekuistego!» A oto Wiekuisty przechodził. Gwałtowna wichura rozwalająca góry i druzgocąca skały [szła] przed Wiekuistym; ale Wiekuisty nie był w wichurze. A po wichurze – trzęsienie ziemi: Wiekuisty nie był w trzęsieniu ziemi. Po trzęsieniu ziemi powstał ogień: Wiekuisty nie był w ogniu. A po tym ogniu – cichy, mruczący dźwięk. (I Krl 19:10-12)

Powyższy fragment wyraża dość jasno jakie są drogi Wiekuistego i jak powinni postępować ludzie, jeśli chcą Jego drogami podążać. Chociaż wszystkie owe zjawiska były efektem działania Boskiej mocą, Boga w nich nie było; Bóg nie był w wietrze, ani w trzęsieniu ziemi, ani w ogniu. Bóg był w tym, co wydarzyło się na końcu – był w szmerze łagodnego powiewu, w cichym mruczącym dźwięku. Tym samym właściwe oczach Boga działania to działania spokojne o przezorne.

Właśnie w taki spokojny i cierpliwy sposób powinniśmy podchodzić do zła. Ogólnie rzecz biorąc, nigdy nie powinniśmy pozwalać na to, by zło zdominowało nasze umysły ani zachowanie. Reszta zależy od sytuacji. Czasami musimy aktywnie walczyć przeciw złu, czasami musimy pozostać obojętni, a czasami musimy odpowiedzieć dobrem na zło. Wszystko zależy od ogromu zła i dynamiki sił między zaangażowanymi stronami: jeśli przewaga siły jest po naszej stronie, a nasze życie i dobrobyt nie są zagrożone, to wówczas mamy luksus odpowiadania na zło dobrem, z intencją pokazania komuś dobrej drogi. Jeśli bilans sił się równoważy, zwykle lepiej zachować spokój i negocjować, próbować odciągnąć osobę od złej ścieżki, udaremnić złe intencje i plany. Jeśli jednakże siła jest po stronie złoczyńców, to nie mamy wielkiego wyboru: możemy albo uciec i poświęcić wszystko, co cenimy, albo podjąć ryzyko żarliwej walki w celu przywrócenia prawidłowego status quo (i tak było w przypadku Pinchasa).

Akt zabójstwa, jakiego dokonali Pinchas czy Eliasz, nie stanowił uzasadnionego odebrania życia już w czasach talmudycznych, nie mówiąc o czasach współczesnych, kiedy uznano by to po prostu za morderstwo (choć może był to akt wojny? Możliwe, ale to już osobny, rozległy temat). Obie historie zawierają jednak jeszcze jedno przesłanie: każdy eskalujący konflikt społeczny może w pewnym momencie osiągnąć swój punkt krytyczny, po którym nie ma już powrotu. Po osiągnięciu tego punktu jest już tylko przemoc i ta przemoc staje się “przemocą uzasadnioną” w oczach każdej ze stron, która uzna, że jest ona ostatecznością. Nie mamy jednak wiedzy a priori o tym, kiedy ów punkt krytyczny może zostać osiągnięty. Dlatego w naszych niespokojnych czasach, w których niemal wszystko może stać się przedmiotem sięgający zenitu emocji, musimy przynajmniej starać się wysłuchać argumentów „drugiej strony” i potraktować je poważnie, w imię pokoju. Im częściej to będziemy robić, tym lepiej. I chociaż czasem można poświęcić pokój w imię prawdy, to właśnie pokój jest zasadniczo tym, co leży w interesie wszystkich ze stron: nie tylko w interesie naszego „plemienia”, ale w interesie całej ludzkości.

Szabat szalom!

Menachem Mirski- student rabinacki w Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies, American Jewish University, Los Angeles, USA.
Menachem Mirski is a Polish born philosopher, musician, scholar and international speaker. He earned his Ph.D. in Philosophy and is currently studying to become a Rabbi at the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies. His current area of interests focus on freedom of expression and thought as well as the laws of logic as it pertains to the discourse of ideology and social and political issues. Dr. Mirski has been a leader in Polish klezmer music scene for well over a decade and his LA based band is called Waking Jericho.